Patience is a virtue (and the Moss Slip Stitch)

 

 

The past few weeks, I’ve been working on a new stitch pattern called the Moss Slip Stitch from the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary (you can read my review of the book here). The Moss Slip Stitch is a beautiful stitch, especially in small gauge. I have to say it’s the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far and my KB round looms make it look really nice because of the tight 3/8″ loom gauge. The pictures don’t do it justice.

The problem is that I started out with a knit stitch for the selvedge and I didn’t realize it would make the whole scarf curl in. I should have done a garter stitch. While there are purls in this pattern, it was not enough to stop the curling. I think I will need to make this thing double length so that I can loop it around twice and make it a nice infinity scarf/cowl scarf.

Here’s a picture of my recent progress. I still have a long way to go to get this done.

This project requires a lot of patience as more than once, I’ve done 1-2 rows incorrectly and then had to figure out which row I should have done and then unravel the mistakes and start that section over again. And whenever I set the project down and start up again, I tend to lose my place.

It is a lesson in patience.

How can it be that the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far has resulted in a project I’m hesitant about finishing?

And yet, because the stitch is so lovely, how can I not finish it? The knitter’s moral dilemma.

I will persevere!

For those wanting to try the moss slip stitch on a loom, I would suggest getting a copy of the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary. This pattern is a slightly different version of the moss stitch and I haven’t seen it in other tutorials, or I’d post the pattern instructions here.

It’s similar to the Irish moss and the double moss, but there are stitches that you skip over and slip behind the peg.

I did find a needle knit tutorial of this stitch on YouTube, but the finished piece looks a little different because the video shows how to knit the moss slip stitch in two colors rather than one. However, it is essentially the same pattern (if you follow the video, you’d just need to convert for the loom).

Loom Review – KB Baby-Knit Looms

My Baby-Knit Looms from Authentic Knitting Board came in this past week! I was very excited to try them out.

Sometimes it is hard to gauge whether you need to use a 24-peg loom or a 31-peg loom when making baby hats (or how many pegs to use on a small-gauge loom like the All-in-One), so this loom takes the guesswork out of the process of making baby hats and baby booties.

My first impressions:

As you can see from the photos, the set comes with a 56-peg loom in a sea-green/blue-green color and a small 24-peg loom in purple. The sea-green loom is designed for infant hats and the purple loom is for baby booties. Both looms are 3/8″ gauge, so you can use one strand of thin yarn. The booklet suggests one strand of #3.

You’ll also find a knitting hook and a booklet that offers basic instructions, which includes one hat pattern and one baby booties pattern. The booklet covers basic stitches: e-wrap, true knit, purl, and u-knit and shows you methods for casting on and binding off. The instructions are written in English and in French (sorry, no Spanish).

   

According to the booklet, a hat made in true-knit or u-knit will fit infants 0-6 months and e-wrap will fit 6-12 months (up to a 17.5″ circumference).

The first thing I noticed when handling these looms is that they are sturdy. The plastic is dense and the quality is good. I tried pulling on some pegs and they are very securely attached, but they have enough give to bend a little. They don’t feel cheap like my Boye looms. They feel heavier, too. Surprisingly, the material feels very soft in the hand.

I think it might take me a minute to get used to the weight, but I’m very impressed with the quality. I have never been disappointed in the quality of any KB loom I’ve purchased.

One plus of this yarn is that you can use a fine baby yarn for a more delicate look (like you’d get with needle-knit or crochet). Of course you can double or triple a thin yarn, but this loom allows you to use one strand, which is nice if you don’t want your hat to feel too thick, such as for a newborn hat in the summertime.

 

Thoughts after knitting with it for an hour:

The gauge is pretty narrow. I think it might be a little smaller than my KB Basics 32-peg loom, but I’d have to measure to be sure as KB doesn’t list the gauge for on the 32-peg loom on their website.

When I got the Baby-Knit Looms, I didn’t have a #3 yarn handy except for a wool yarn I didn’t want to use, so I knitted with a Caron soft #4 and that worked.

So far, I like the loom and as mentioned, I think one of the big selling-points of this loom is it takes the confusion out of making baby sets.

For beginning knitters, if you don’t have an exact pattern you’re working from that calls for a specific size of loom, it can be a little confusing to know whether you should use a 24-peg or a 31-peg loom. I like that this loom can make hats for babies up to 12 months and all you need to do is change the stitch to make the hat smaller or larger. For babies older than 12 months, you’d need to use a wide gauge 31-peg loom or you can make it on the All-in-One loom. Here is a link to some of the baby patterns on the KB website. Right now, KB has 3 patterns for the Baby-Knit Loom.

I would give this loom 4.5 stars.

It’s sturdy and well-made, it takes the guesswork out of sizing, and it is very affordable. I’d like to see more patterns for it, but the product is new and I’m sure designers will start coming up with more adorable baby sets to suit this loom.

 

*Disclosure: I purchased this loom set and did not receive any compensation for this review. All opinions are my own. This post does include affiliate/advertising links.