Loom Knitting Stitches – Resources

 

My current obsession is finding new loom knitting stitches. If you’re a beginner to intermediate knitter, you might be wondering what other stitches are out there to try and where to find them. So I’ve put together some online and printed resources where you can find stitch patterns for your loom.

ONLINE

Isela Phelps Blog – Isela writes books on loom knitting and she also creates patterns for KB (Authentic Knitting Board). She has two loom knitting guides that will show you how to do stitches such as garter stitch, 2×2 rib stitch, basketweave, moss stitch, a diagonal herringbone, slip stitches and more.

Loomahat – You can find a lot of stitches on both the blog and the YouTube channel, as well as buy downloadable stitch booklets, which are sold on Amazon and Etsy. Denise’s blog and videos are VERY beginner-friendly. Pretty much all of the stitch tutorials that she makes also have a video, so you can follow along step-by-step. Examples of stitches include: bamboo, Andalusian, basketweave, double moss, farrow, linen, tiny heart, open weave, waffle, and more.

KB Looms Blog – on the Authentic Knitting Board website, they have some stitch patterns (as well as beginner tutorials) available. This link will take you to the Stitchology page which has 39 stitch patterns, including eyelets and cable knits. They offer instructions for knitting an 8×8 inch square in each pattern.

Keep in mind that the instructions for the squares are designed for a small gauge loom, so if you have a Knifty Knitter, Boye, Darice, Loops & Threads or other large gauge loom, your finished product would be much bigger than 8×8 inches.

Loom Knit Central – They have tutorials for double knitting (also called double rake knitting). Examples of stitches include the stockinette (knit), rib, box, ladder, honeycomb, star, brioche and even a cable stitch.

 

BOOKS

Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary – This book gives you 90 stitches that can be made on the loom, including basic knit and purl stitches to eyelets and cables. It gives you instructions for flat knitting and knitting in the round. It’s a handy go-to book for practicing new loom knitting stitches. I’d recommend this for the intermediate to advanced knitter or a beginner who is comfortable reading knit patterns without a step-by-step tutorial.

Loom Knitting Primer – This book by Isela Phelps is basically a bible for loom knitting. It has instructions for just about everything a beginner needs to know to get started with loom knitting. It includes project patterns and there is a list of stitch patterns in the back. This is the book I’d recommend for a beginning loom knitter. Intermediate knitters can skip to the back to see a list of stitches, which includes knitting charts.

Loom Knitting Stitches: My Top 10 Volume 1 – This book is written by Denise Canela from Loomahat. The book includes written instructions for the bamboo stitch, celtic knot stitch, basketweave, and several other stitches. It is similar to what is on her blog, but is handy if you want to have the stitch instructions in one place. She gives you instructions for flat knitting and knitting in the round.

If you get lost while trying out the pattern, Denise does include links to her Youtube Tutorials. This book is also available as a PDF from Etsy.

The Easier Way To Knit: A Guide to Double Rake Loom Knitting for All Skill Levels – I haven’t tried this book yet (as of Jan 2019) but it’s been on my list of books to try. It is a tutorial for double knitting, which you can do on a long loom (the rectangular looms). The back of the book has a stitch guide.

The Knitting Bible – Okay, so it’s technically not a loom knitting book, but if you can read a knitting chart (or if you know how to convert a pattern), you’ll find a lot of stitches in here. I’d recommend this for the intermediate to advanced loom knitter. Every stitch has a picture of the stitch, instructions and a knitting chart.

 

 

 

 

Patience is a virtue (and the Moss Slip Stitch)

 

 

The past few weeks, I’ve been working on a new stitch pattern called the Moss Slip Stitch from the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary (you can read my review of the book here). The Moss Slip Stitch is a beautiful stitch, especially in small gauge. I have to say it’s the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far and my KB round looms make it look really nice because of the tight 3/8″ loom gauge. The pictures don’t do it justice.

The problem is that I started out with a knit stitch for the selvedge and I didn’t realize it would make the whole scarf curl in. I should have done a garter stitch. While there are purls in this pattern, it was not enough to stop the curling. I think I will need to make this thing double length so that I can loop it around twice and make it a nice infinity scarf/cowl scarf.

Here’s a picture of my recent progress. I still have a long way to go to get this done.

This project requires a lot of patience as more than once, I’ve done 1-2 rows incorrectly and then had to figure out which row I should have done and then unravel the mistakes and start that section over again. And whenever I set the project down and start up again, I tend to lose my place.

It is a lesson in patience.

How can it be that the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far has resulted in a project I’m hesitant about finishing?

And yet, because the stitch is so lovely, how can I not finish it? The knitter’s moral dilemma.

I will persevere!

For those wanting to try the moss slip stitch on a loom, I would suggest getting a copy of the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary. This pattern is a slightly different version of the moss stitch and I haven’t seen it in other tutorials, or I’d post the pattern instructions here.

It’s similar to the Irish moss and the double moss, but there are stitches that you skip over and slip behind the peg.

I did find a needle knit tutorial of this stitch on YouTube, but the finished piece looks a little different because the video shows how to knit the moss slip stitch in two colors rather than one. However, it is essentially the same pattern (if you follow the video, you’d just need to convert for the loom).

Roman Stitch Hats

Roman-stitch-hat-closeup1

One of the projects I worked on over the holidays was a Roman stitch hat for a little girl who is like a goddaughter to us. I knitted a Roman stitch hat for her and a garter stitch hat for her sister.

I got the idea while perusing the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary by Kathy Norris. You can find my review of it here.

I ended up making two of these because I realized the first hat I made was more of a baby/toddler hat, so I made it again on a 36-peg loom so that it would fit an older child.

You can see both hats here:

Roman-stitch-hat-sm-med1

Since I’ve only seen the Roman stitch mentioned in a couple of places, I’m not sure if this is a common stitch, so I won’t post the exact instructions here. If you’d like to make one of these, I’d recommend getting the stitch dictionary.

If you know how to u-knit, purl, and do the gathered bind off, you can make this hat.

I used the Darice 36-peg loom and made a garter stitch brim. This is a wide gauge loom. You could make this on a small gauge loom, but you’d need two strands of thin yarn or one strand of worsted weight.

For the brim, I did three sets of garter stitch, but I did it as purl one row, knit one row instead of starting with the knit row first. The knit stitches are u-knit, not ewrap. I wanted the hat to fit an older child (6-11), not a teen, so I used u-knit so that the stitches would be a little tighter.

I used two skeins of yarn and knit as one. The yarn was Red Heart Super Saver in Country Blue and I think the multi-colored one was the Monet Print colorway, but I’m not sure. It was blue with pink, purple, and yellow mixed in.

Note: The Roman Stitch works best with an EVEN number of pegs, so if you are not using a 36-peg loom, make sure you choose one with an even number.

The hat “pattern” for the child’s hat went like this:

Brim:

E-wrap cast on
Row 1: Purl across
Row 2: Knit across
Row 3: Purl across
Row 4: Knit across
Row 5: Purl across
Row 6: Knit across

Body of the hat:

Roman stitch x 6
(The Roman stitch is essentially made up of knit rows and then a combination of knits and purls. Again, for the exact instructions, see the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary).

Last row: Knit across then do the gathered bind off. For those new to looming, you will need a tapestry needle for the gathered bind off.

Here is a close-up of the Roman stitch:

Roman-stitch-close-up1

You can see in the photo that one of the Roman stitches in the middle has an extra “knit” as I’d lost track of my count so that one section in the middle is a little longer that the rest.

And for those who are curious as to what the inside looks like, here is the reverse side (inside) of the hat:

Roman-stitch-hat-reverse1

This was a fun and relatively easy hat to make! If you’re looking for something new to try, I recommend it.

I also used this yarn combination when I made the hurdle stitch hat for my niece last year.

If you are interested in checking out the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary, written by Kathy Norris, you can find it at Joann, Amazon, and the Leisure Arts website. The author has written several books on loom knitting.

Do you have a favorite hat stitch or pattern you like to use? Let us know in the comments.

 

Book Review – Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary

Loom-Stitch-Dictionary

Hi everyone!

I hope you had a wonderful holiday. This holiday season, I’ve mostly been resting and recuperating from a recent surgery, so it’s given me time to knit! Recently, I’ve been working with a few stitch patterns from the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary by Kathy Norris. It is published by Leisure Arts. Kathy has written several other loom knitting books as well.

I bought this book early on in my loom knitting adventures, before I really knew what to do with it. When I first opened the book and looked inside, it was a bit overwhelming. Now that I’m an intermediate loom knitter, it’s very useful for coming up with my own creations and learning new stitches.

So I will say this book is better suited for someone who has already loom knitted a few projects rather than someone who is completely starting from scratch. It is not suited for beginners. If you’re looking for really easy to follow instructions for knitting your first or second project, then I would recommend going to YouTube or Loomahat.com. Or, you can try one of these books:

Loom Knitting Primer by Isela Phelps or Round Loom Knitting in 10 Easy Projects by Nicole F. Fox. Both books assume you know nothing about loom knitting and explain the tools you need, loom gauge, casting on, binding off, knit vs. purl, and they include patterns.

Back to the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary. If you have already knitted a few items and you know how to read a pattern (or you have experience with needle knit patterns), then you can follow along in this book.

It presumes that you already know how to create knit and purl stitches.

I should clarify because the first chapter assumes that you know how to create a “true-knit”, which is different from the e-wrap knit stitch that most of us learned when we started loom knitting. There are some pictures of this in the very back of the book. I think the instructions should have been at the beginning because new knitters who have only used e-wrap aren’t going to know that knit does not mean e-wrap unless they read the book in order. Ms. Norris does mention at the beginning of the knit and purl chapter that she’s using true knit, but it would be easy to miss if you’re skimming and choosing a pattern by looking at the pictures.

If you’re like me and you prefer a simpler stitch, you can u-knit where it asks for knit (true knit).

In this book, e-wrap falls under the chapter on “Twisted Stitches”. The code in the book for e-wrap is EWK. So patterns will either say K for true knit or they will say EWK. Purl stitches will say P.

Here is a picture of the Table of Contents:

Loom-Stitch-Dictionary1

And here are some of the stitch patterns you can create:

Loom-Stitch-Dictionary2Loom-Stitch-Dictionary3Loom-Stitch-Dictionary4

* These photos were taken of my personal copy of Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary, but I do not own the copyright for the original photographs. These photos were taken for review purposes only.

The book does include patterns for using multiple colors and explains how to change colors and how to skip stitches. I haven’t tried any multi-color patterns from the book yet, so I can’t comment on those.  It also gives instructions for decreasing (which you’ll need to understand to create the lace patterns).

For the most part, Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary is easy to follow, once you know how to read patterns, and it includes instructions for working on a flat panel (i.e., a scarf or blanket) or for circular knitting (such as a hat or cowl). This is very useful as some stitch patterns have to be worked differently depending on whether you are knitting in the round or not.

For each stitch pattern, you’ll find a picture of the stitch, the name of the stitch, and then instructions for how to knit the stitch in a flat panel or in the round.

I think it would have been helpful if there’d been an index so you could find a stitch right away without flipping through. It’s not too much of an issue since the dictionary is short. I just think it would be helpful for those who want to look up a stitch by name, but don’t know exactly what it looks like.

Note: This book contains stitch patterns only and a few loom instructions. It DOES NOT show you how to make a hat, scarf or other finished items.

It is a reference book designed to: 1. Help you find new stitches 2. Look up a stitch by the picture to find out the name of the stitch and how to knit it.

To use this book, you need to know how to cast on and bind off and understand what loom size and yarn weight you need for your project. Though, thankfully, there is a chart on yarn weight in the beginning of the book, on page 5, and another one at the end on page 91.

This is why I say Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary is not for beginning loom knitters, unless you already have experience with needle knitting or crochet. If you’re an intermediate or advanced loom knitter, you’ll get a lot more out of the dictionary.

I like the portable size of the book. It’s light weight and easy to take with you, though it is not pocket-sized. But it will fit in a medium to large purse or a yarn bag.

I accidentally spilled something near my copy, so the top edge of the book got wet, but since the pages are nice and thick for the photographs, the book is still in good condition.

The review score and my final thoughts:

I vacillated on the score because I was tempted to give a lower rating. The reason: I wish it was more accessible for beginners. If it had a few more pictures of looming techniques and maybe a glossary of loom knitting terms, I’d probably give it 5 stars. However, there are other books that are specifically geared for people who are new to loom knitting. This book isn’t trying to be a catch-all book to teach you everything.

It is first and foremost a dictionary of stitches and in that regard, it does exactly what it intends to do – give a name and picture of each stitch and a basic pattern for how it is knitted.

I’d give this book 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Overall, this is a great reference book for intermediate to advanced loom knitters and Kathy Norris has taken the time to convert various needle-knit stitches to loom knitting so that you don’t have to sit and figure it out yourself. Thank you, Ms. Norris!

You can find this book, and other books by Kathy Norris, at LeisureArts.com, Joann.com, Amazon.com, and you might be able to find one at Michael’s (in-store), but they generally have a smaller selection of knitting books.

 

* Disclosure: This book was purchased by me and I did not receive any compensation from the author or publisher. All opinions are my own. This post does include affiliate links, so if you purchase via the link, I would receive a small commission, which helps me keep the blog running.

 

 

Will post more reviews and patterns soon

Sorry it’s been a little while since I’ve posted. I’ve been dealing with a health issue and there was a flurry of activity recently as my 40th birthday just passed. On the plus side, two of my friends got me a book on loom knitting afghans and I bought the Knitting Board Double-Knit Rotating Loom with an Amazon gift card I got on my birthday.

I did work on a few projects in April and May. In April, I was mostly trying to figure out how to do the Criss-Cross stitch, which is a double-knit pattern for the loom. I made a short, round scarf and I’ve started working on a bigger multi-colored scarf in this pattern. I hope to post a pattern review and links, but this one is complicated, so it might take me a while to put it up.

I also made a basket weave hat in May after seeing a stitch pattern in Isela Phelp’s Loom Knitting Primer book. It was the first time that I’ve had to be really careful with my stitches and actually write down each row as I worked the pattern. It’s easy to miss a step and screw up the pattern. I made a pretty green hat for my niece, Taylor, whose birthday is the same week as mine. Go Geminis! 🙂

Here’s a close-up of the basket-weave hat. The lighting doesn’t show all of the shifts in the pattern. I used a folded over rib stitch for the brim.

Basket_Weave_Hat

If you’d like to try the basket weave, I definitely recommend Isela’s book, which you can find on Amazon (click the picture for details). If you just want to learn this stitch, she has instructions for the basket weave in a free loom knitting stitch guide on her blog.

Note: Isela also creates patterns for Knitting Board, so if you check out their free patterns on their website, you’ll see a few that she has created.

This month, I’m working on a triple stitch scarf for a close friend (who coincidentally also had a birthday the same week as my niece and I). My friend wanted a scarf in either olive green or forest green so I found a nice red heart yarn that was a cross between the two. I’ll probably post pictures of it later once it’s finished.

I’m hoping to post a review of the All-in-One loom this month, which is the 18-inch loom by Knitting Board.

My posting schedule might be a little sporadic this summer as things are pretty hectic at work and I will be having a surgery in July. I’m hoping I’ll be able to knit as I recuperate!

Do you have any exciting projects you’re knitting this summer? Let us know in the comments below.

Happy Looming!