Black Spiral Hat for me

I took a break from my moss slip stitch scarf and decided to make a hat for myself, since we’re about to hit our rainy season in Southern California (the bulk of our rainfall hits February through April). I wanted something quick, but fun, so I opted to make a spiral hat for myself.

Since I’m a bit more experienced at making these than when I made my second knit hat a year ago, I decided to try making it a slightly different way. I marked my initial purl stitches with stitch markers, but then I wrapped my knit stitches (without knitting them off) and just did my purl stitches and continued that way around the loom, so that I had a bunch of wrapped pegs where the knit stitches were, and did the purls as I went.

At the end of each row, I went back and knitted off all of the knit stitches, except the ones right before my last purls, so I could keep track.

This way, I didn’t have to move around the stitch markers as much. I’d seen something similar in a Loomahat video last year, where the knit stitches were wrapped but not knitted off so that you can keep track of the 3 knit-2 purl or 4 knit-1 purl pattern.

black_spiral_hat3   black_spiral_hat2

Sorry about the image quality. The picture on the right is closer to the true color of the hat, but I had to take it again with the flash for the spirals to show up.

 

To make this hat, here is the basic pattern:

Tools needed:

* 36-peg wide gauge loom. I used my new Darice loom set.
Note: You need an odd-numbered loom to make the spiral, otherwise you will end up with a rib stitch pattern. Basically, a multiple of 5 plus 1. That plus one is VERY important.
If you want to knit a hat for an adult man or a woman with a larger head, use a 41-peg loom. The 36-peg will make a woman’s or teenager’s hat.
* Knitting hook / knitting tool
* Tapestry Needle for doing the bind off
* 2 skeins of yarn or you can take one skein and wind it up into two balls
(I think I used Red Heart with Love Metallic in Black)
* Optional: Crochet hook to sew in the loose ends when the hat is done.

If you want to know what looms, knitting hooks, and tapestry needles I use, you can click on Venus’ Loom Bag.


Knitting Instructions:

Cast on

(We will do 3 sets of garter stitch rows for the brim. This is NOT a thick, fold-over brim. You’ll need more rows to make a fold-over brim – you can try 6-8 sets of garter stitch)
Row 1: Knit
Row 2: Purl
Row 3: Knit
Row 4: Purl
Row 5: Knit
Row 6: Purl

(Now for the body of the hat, which in my case has a knit 3, purl 2 pattern. You could also do a knit 4, purl 1 pattern, if you prefer). I used an e-wrap stitch.

Knit 3, purl 2 (repeat this for every row).
Note: Because you are using an odd-numbered loom, your starting peg will move with each row.

For an adult hat: Follow this pattern until your hat measures about 9″.
For a man with a large head, you might wish to do 10″. For a teenager, knit 7.5″-8″ long.

* If you are new to loom knitting or find yourself getting very confused with keeping track of your stitch pattern, you’ll want to use stitch markers around the entire loom. See my old post about how I made my first spiral hat. The processed I used was a little more time consuming, but less likely to cause errors in the pattern.

For intermediate/advanced knitters: wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2, wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2 and continue until you have completed one row around the loom. Don’t knit off, just leave the pegs wrapped until you complete your row.

Once your row is done, knit off all of the wrapped pegs. Your starting place has now moved down one peg because you are using an odd-numbered loom. As you start a new row, move your stitch marker to reflect your new starting peg.

If you are working left to right, your starting peg is now one peg to the left of the original starting point. If you are working right to left, your starting peg is now one to the right of your original starting point.

Now, move your starting peg stitch marker and go ahead and knit your next row: knit 3, purl 2 (repeat).

You want to keep track of where your starting peg is for each row. I recommend the Boye stich markers that easily open and close or a diaper-pin style stitch marker as you can remove these without taking your yarn off of the peg.

Continue knitting more rows until your hat measures around 9″ long.

Once your hat is long enough, do a gathered bind off.

A gathered bind off will keep your pattern neat. If you tried to do a decrease, it would most likely throw off your stitch pattern.

Sew in your loose ends at the top of the hat. If needed, tighten your cast on row, then sew in the tail of yarn from when you started the project.

I hope you enjoyed this spiral hat. It was fun and quick to make.

Until next time, happy looming!

black_spiral_hat5

 

 

Roman Stitch Hats

Roman-stitch-hat-closeup1

One of the projects I worked on over the holidays was a Roman stitch hat for a little girl who is like a goddaughter to us. I knitted a Roman stitch hat for her and a garter stitch hat for her sister.

I got the idea while perusing the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary by Kathy Norris. You can find my review of it here.

I ended up making two of these because I realized the first hat I made was more of a baby/toddler hat, so I made it again on a 36-peg loom so that it would fit an older child.

You can see both hats here:

Roman-stitch-hat-sm-med1

Since I’ve only seen the Roman stitch mentioned in a couple of places, I’m not sure if this is a common stitch, so I won’t post the exact instructions here. If you’d like to make one of these, I’d recommend getting the stitch dictionary.

If you know how to u-knit, purl, and do the gathered bind off, you can make this hat.

I used the Darice 36-peg loom and made a garter stitch brim. This is a wide gauge loom. You could make this on a small gauge loom, but you’d need two strands of thin yarn or one strand of worsted weight.

For the brim, I did three sets of garter stitch, but I did it as purl one row, knit one row instead of starting with the knit row first. The knit stitches are u-knit, not ewrap. I wanted the hat to fit an older child (6-11), not a teen, so I used u-knit so that the stitches would be a little tighter.

I used two skeins of yarn and knit as one. The yarn was Red Heart Super Saver in Country Blue and I think the multi-colored one was the Monet Print colorway, but I’m not sure. It was blue with pink, purple, and yellow mixed in.

Note: The Roman Stitch works best with an EVEN number of pegs, so if you are not using a 36-peg loom, make sure you choose one with an even number.

The hat “pattern” for the child’s hat went like this:

Brim:

E-wrap cast on
Row 1: Purl across
Row 2: Knit across
Row 3: Purl across
Row 4: Knit across
Row 5: Purl across
Row 6: Knit across

Body of the hat:

Roman stitch x 6
(The Roman stitch is essentially made up of knit rows and then a combination of knits and purls. Again, for the exact instructions, see the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary).

Last row: Knit across then do the gathered bind off. For those new to looming, you will need a tapestry needle for the gathered bind off.

Here is a close-up of the Roman stitch:

Roman-stitch-close-up1

You can see in the photo that one of the Roman stitches in the middle has an extra “knit” as I’d lost track of my count so that one section in the middle is a little longer that the rest.

And for those who are curious as to what the inside looks like, here is the reverse side (inside) of the hat:

Roman-stitch-hat-reverse1

This was a fun and relatively easy hat to make! If you’re looking for something new to try, I recommend it.

I also used this yarn combination when I made the hurdle stitch hat for my niece last year.

If you are interested in checking out the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary, written by Kathy Norris, you can find it at Joann, Amazon, and the Leisure Arts website. The author has written several books on loom knitting.

Do you have a favorite hat stitch or pattern you like to use? Let us know in the comments.

 

Will post more reviews and patterns soon

Sorry it’s been a little while since I’ve posted. I’ve been dealing with a health issue and there was a flurry of activity recently as my 40th birthday just passed. On the plus side, two of my friends got me a book on loom knitting afghans and I bought the Knitting Board Double-Knit Rotating Loom with an Amazon gift card I got on my birthday.

I did work on a few projects in April and May. In April, I was mostly trying to figure out how to do the Criss-Cross stitch, which is a double-knit pattern for the loom. I made a short, round scarf and I’ve started working on a bigger multi-colored scarf in this pattern. I hope to post a pattern review and links, but this one is complicated, so it might take me a while to put it up.

I also made a basket weave hat in May after seeing a stitch pattern in Isela Phelp’s Loom Knitting Primer book. It was the first time that I’ve had to be really careful with my stitches and actually write down each row as I worked the pattern. It’s easy to miss a step and screw up the pattern. I made a pretty green hat for my niece, Taylor, whose birthday is the same week as mine. Go Geminis! 🙂

Here’s a close-up of the basket-weave hat. The lighting doesn’t show all of the shifts in the pattern. I used a folded over rib stitch for the brim.

Basket_Weave_Hat

If you’d like to try the basket weave, I definitely recommend Isela’s book, which you can find on Amazon (click the picture for details). If you just want to learn this stitch, she has instructions for the basket weave in a free loom knitting stitch guide on her blog.

Note: Isela also creates patterns for Knitting Board, so if you check out their free patterns on their website, you’ll see a few that she has created.

This month, I’m working on a triple stitch scarf for a close friend (who coincidentally also had a birthday the same week as my niece and I). My friend wanted a scarf in either olive green or forest green so I found a nice red heart yarn that was a cross between the two. I’ll probably post pictures of it later once it’s finished.

I’m hoping to post a review of the All-in-One loom this month, which is the 18-inch loom by Knitting Board.

My posting schedule might be a little sporadic this summer as things are pretty hectic at work and I will be having a surgery in July. I’m hoping I’ll be able to knit as I recuperate!

Do you have any exciting projects you’re knitting this summer? Let us know in the comments below.

Happy Looming!

Looming Adventure: Rib & Garter Stitch Hat

rib-garter-hat1

So last weekend, I decided to try a pattern of my own. Though it didn’t quite come out the way I envisioned, the overall concept did work out. The picture above is of a baby-sized hat.

I wanted to make a hat that combined a rib stitch and a garter stitch. I will probably make this again and write up more detailed instructions. Essentially, I used a 2×2 rib stitch and in the middle I used garter stitches. But somehow I got a little off, so I think it was more like k1, p1, k2, p1. Then I repeated the rib stitch pattern until I was ready to do a decrease.

When I was ready to start the decrease, I used a garter stitch and then I did the k2tog where you’re taking the loop off a peg and moving it to the left to knit 2 together so that you end up with a loop on every other peg. I kept decreasing until I could close the hat and then I stitched it up with my tapestry needle to make sure the top was secure and flipped the hat inside out (since the rib stitch and garter stitch are pretty much reversible).

I made the hat on the Knitting Board Loom Knitting Basics Loom, which is the small 7 inch loom with 32 pegs. You could similarly use the 10 inch KB loom, the KB All-in-One loom or one of the small KB hat looms. If you’re using a wide-gauge round loom, you could use two #4 worsted weight strands and make the baby/child-sized hat on a 24-peg loom or a 32-peg loom. You could also use a larger loom to make an adult-sized hat.

If you like this pattern, please let me know and I’ll re-make this and write up more detailed instructions for it. But it was nice to try out a different pattern and also to practice a new technique (this is my first hat using a k2tog decrease).

I used Red Heart Ombre Yarn in purple.

 

Blue hat for my niece (hurdle stitch)

Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

My niece’s birthday is this weekend. Happy Birthday, Alayna! So in honor of her birthday, I decided to loom knit a hat in one of her favorite colors (blue). I wanted to make something new that I’d never tried before. In the past, I’ve made garter-stitch, rib-stitch, and spiral-knit hats.

As I was browsing for something new to try, I saw a hat pattern posted on Knitting with Looms and thought it would make a cute hat. I had a skein of blue Red Heart with Love yarn and some multi-colored Red Heart Super Saver yarn so I decided to combine them. I used my Loops & Threads 36-peg round loom.

I used a basic rib stitch for the brim (knit 2, purl 2). The body of the hat uses an alternating knit and purl stitch pattern (see the link above for the exact pattern). It’s called the Hurdle Stitch. To track my stitches, I used my Boye stitch markers. If you’re new to loom knitting, stitch markers are your friends! It’s very helpful to mark your pegs in some way so that you can track where you are in the pattern and where you left off.

Close up of stitches. Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting.

You can use actual stitch markers such as the Boye stitch markers or Clover stitch markers or you can use a rubber band or washi tape. I tried using a sharpie on my first loom, but after a while, the sharpie color wears off. Some people just tie a piece of yarn on the loom (in a different color than the project).

Tip: If I am marking pegs for a pattern that changes during the project, I like the Boye ones because they snap open and closed and you can remove the stitch marker and place it on a new peg at any point in the project. This is helpful for a pattern where you have to change the stitches in the middle.

For this hurdle stitch hat, you could use rubber bands, tape, or closed stitch markers because you’re basically just marking every other peg. You don’t need to remove the markers until the project is over.

The hurdle stitch pattern is suitable for beginners, though if you’ve never knitted before, I would probably start with a basic knit or garter stitch pattern until you get the hang of the knit and purl stitches.

I like the way it came out. Hopefully my niece will like it too!

If you like to loom, what is your favorite stitch pattern?