Patience is a virtue (and the Moss Slip Stitch)

 

 

The past few weeks, I’ve been working on a new stitch pattern called the Moss Slip Stitch from the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary (you can read my review of the book here). The Moss Slip Stitch is a beautiful stitch, especially in small gauge. I have to say it’s the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far and my KB round looms make it look really nice because of the tight 3/8″ loom gauge. The pictures don’t do it justice.

The problem is that I started out with a knit stitch for the selvedge and I didn’t realize it would make the whole scarf curl in. I should have done a garter stitch. While there are purls in this pattern, it was not enough to stop the curling. I think I will need to make this thing double length so that I can loop it around twice and make it a nice infinity scarf/cowl scarf.

Here’s a picture of my recent progress. I still have a long way to go to get this done.

This project requires a lot of patience as more than once, I’ve done 1-2 rows incorrectly and then had to figure out which row I should have done and then unravel the mistakes and start that section over again. And whenever I set the project down and start up again, I tend to lose my place.

It is a lesson in patience.

How can it be that the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far has resulted in a project I’m hesitant about finishing?

And yet, because the stitch is so lovely, how can I not finish it? The knitter’s moral dilemma.

I will persevere!

For those wanting to try the moss slip stitch on a loom, I would suggest getting a copy of the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary. This pattern is a slightly different version of the moss stitch and I haven’t seen it in other tutorials, or I’d post the pattern instructions here.

It’s similar to the Irish moss and the double moss, but there are stitches that you skip over and slip behind the peg.

I did find a needle knit tutorial of this stitch on YouTube, but the finished piece looks a little different because the video shows how to knit the moss slip stitch in two colors rather than one. However, it is essentially the same pattern (if you follow the video, you’d just need to convert for the loom).

Loom Review – Knitting Board All-in-One Loom

I bought the Knitting Board All-in-One Loom several months ago, but didn’t have a chance to play with it until April. The All-in-One Loom is designed to be a single loom that can accomplish multiple projects of different sizes – hats, scarves, blankets, socks, baby clothes and various double-knit and round-loom projects.

The loom is 18 inches and is set up with wooden spacers, bolts, washers, and nuts so that you can adjust the spacing of the loom. You can use the really small spacers for double-knits, and you can use the larger spacers with pegs on them for knitting in the round or for doing blanket panels.

The loom has a smaller gauge than the typical inexpensive, plastic looms you might buy from your local craft store or Amazon. You can knit hats and scarves without having to double your yarn (unless you’re using a fine yarn). A single strand of #4, worsted-weight yarn works great.

The All-in-One is long, so turning it and knitting the little spacer pegs can be a bit awkward until you get used to it (especially if you’re making a smaller item where you have to reach in between the long side pieces to get to the spacer that’s in the middle. Check out the pictures below. I’ve positioned the spacer as if you were making baby booties or something really small.

    

So far, I’ve made a double-knit scarf and a basket-weave hat on the All-in-One loom. Overall, I like it, though initially, I didn’t like that there were only two of the small spacers.

Note for double-knitting:

The small, skinny spacer juts out a little no matter which direction I install it and depending on where you place these spacers, your loom may wobble, especially if you’re knitting on a table or desk rather than in your lap. I asked Knitting Board if it was possible to order an extra spacer to make the bottom of the loom more balanced (they did oblige me and I was able to get two more small spacers). I just need to buy the extra bolts and nuts for them from the hardware store.

Here is an example of how the small spacers jut out at the bottom when you’re using them for double-knitting. This happens even if I turn them in the other direction where they are wider rather than taller.

Oh, I should also mention: when you first change the loom size, it might be hard to get the bolts out. To get my bolts out, I set the loom on its side with the tail/screw end of the bolt on the table and the head of the bolt in the air. I then rock the loom a little and tap it against the table and then the bolt pops out. You could potentially use a hammer or other object to gently tap on the bolts to loosen them from the wood. Just be careful not to damage the loom.

My overall thoughts:

I think the loom is a good buy if you can’t afford to get lots of different looms or you have space constraints and you want one loom that does almost everything. Or if you prefer a small gauge loom and don’t mind the length.

Those with severe arthritis or other dexterity issues might have a harder time with the loom because of the narrow gauge and the awkward size.

Quality-wise, the loom is good. I really like Knitting Board’s looms because they are sturdy, easy to assemble and they are well-constructed.

Overall, I do like the All-in-One loom and will consider it a staple in my collection, but for smaller items, I like my Knitting Board Basics loom because it is more portable, easy to hold in your hand and I don’t have to worry about it wobbling if I’m using a small spacer. I think the basics loom is the same as the 10-inch loom (if you don’t need the booklet and crochet needle). I also have the adjustable hat loom, which is lighter and while it’s also fairly long, it’s a little easier to manipulate when working in the round.

Rating: I give this loom 4.5 stars.

 

*Disclosure: I purchased this loom and did not receive any compensation for this review. All opinions are my own. This post does include affiliate/advertising links.

Fun with double knits

Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

Last weekend, I decided to try my first double-knit project. It is a double stockinette stitch (where both sides of the panel are knit (rather than having a knit on the front side and a purl on the back). The double stockinette looks like a zig-zag pattern on the loom where you zig-zag across in one direction and then zig-zag back in the other direction.

I used the anchor yarn cast on. I’ll have to neaten up the edge at the end.

Here is a link to the instructions for knitting the double stockinette on the Knitting Board website. I followed the stitch pattern from the book that came with my KB Loom Knitting Basics Kit. You can purchase this kit at Joann, Amazon, or the Knitting Board website. Or, if you’re an intermediate knitter and don’t need the book or accessories, you can purchase the 32-peg loom by itself from KB.

I’m nearly done with my scarf and so far, I really love double-knitting. The project comes out so clean and pretty and the stitches have a smooth, finished edge and seem to be very uniform.

Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

The scarf is made with one strand of Red Heart Super Saver Ombre (in Purple). I’d originally single-knitted a few rows with 2 strands of ombre yarn, but since the two skeins were starting with different shades of purple, I didn’t like the mixed color effect. Sometimes I love that, but for the scarf I was making, I really didn’t want it to have that speckled look that you get when you use two different colored strands as one.

I found the double-knit stockinette stitch to be very easy to do and I plan to make more projects with it. I also love my new KB 32-peg loom. It’s easy to hold in your hand and it’s small, so it’s a loom you can take with you anywhere. You can also make hats on it, but I haven’t tried that yet.

The scarf will probably be roughly 5 ft long when finished. I only have about a foot left to go!

Do you like double-knitting or single-knitting? Or does it depend on the project?

 

My first loom

1st-loom-knitting-project
First knitting Project using the Boye Medium Loom

I’ve been loom knitting for about 3 months. I bought my first loom, the Boye medium round loom, during a trip to JoAnn Fabrics with my mother-in-law. It was a spontaneous purchase.

I started a hat that just wasn’t quite working. I’d chosen something more complicated with an open weave and didn’t like the way it looked, so after a few rows, I decided to look on Youtube for a scarf pattern as I figured that the round loom should be able to make scarves as well as hats. So I searched for a loom knitting scarf on a round loom.

I found a video from Loomahat for a garter stitch scarf and immediately set to work. During this time, I got very sick with Bronchitis, so I was bedridden for a week. This was good in the sense that it gave me some time to knit, but I was so sick the first 2-3 days I couldn’t do anything other than eat, sleep, and cough.

The pattern I chose was great because it taught me the basic e-wrap stitch and how to purl. I loved that the loom made it much easier to count stitches. I’ve done some crochet, but I have trouble with many patterns because I’m terrible at counting stitches. All my scarves are done long-ways rather than say crocheting 20 stitches and working my way up the scarf.

Though it took me a few days to complete, I really enjoyed making the scarf. I felt so proud of myself. After that, a loom knitter was born!

If you’d like, you can click to see which looms I own or view my list of completed projects so far.

Thanks so much for stopping by!