Make your own knitting looms

I stumbled across an article a month ago explaining how to make your own knitting looms and I thought that was a cool idea! I was looking for a friend of mine who is just getting into loom knitting (and who has a table saw and woodworking equipment at home).

Are you, or your partner, very handy with tools? Do you have a saw or a sander? If so, then this post is for you. (Or, if you want to do a kid-friendly craft project and make a smaller loom/french knitter, scroll to the bottom)

I will admit that cutting wood and sanding is not my forte. That is the domain of my fiancé who is very good at making things like wooden pens, mugs, boxes, bookcases, etc. He’s the one who can look at a piece of wood and know what tree it is from and who can wax on about different types of nuts, bolts, and screws and what you’d use them for.

While I am not confident enough with these things to make my own looms, I love the idea that with a few pieces of wood and certain nails or screws that you can have a knitting loom! So I wanted to share some resources with those of you who are far more adventurous than I am.

Wooden Loom Tutorials (Written Instructions)

Instructables – Make an Adjustable Knitting Loom

This Instructables tutorial shows you how to make a knitting loom similar to the KB All-in-One loom, where you can adjust the side pieces to the size you want. You can use it to make a hat, socks, or scarves and flat-panel items. What I like about this loom: 1. It is adjustable. 2. The pegs have grooves in them. 3. You can make it in different gauges (there are two versions/instructions for the loom, depending on the spacing you need). There is even a tutorial for making a knitting tool/hook!

The only potential drawback I see is that over time, the pegs might get worn down from the loom hook scraping the wood. I suppose you could put some sort of epoxy or finish on the wood to minimize this or just make the pegs replaceable.

This tutorial is probably a little more advanced than some of the other tutorials.

Knitting Naturally – Make Your Own Knitting Loom

Knitting Naturally covers making a basic knitting loom with wood and nails. It uses more basic tools, so if you don’t have a fancy table saw and router table or a drill press, you can still get the job done if you have sandpaper, a hammer, nails, wood, and a saw. While the instructions are not too complicated, the only drawback to this tutorial is that there aren’t pictures of what each step looks like, so you’re just reading the instructions.

Video Tutorials

I know some of you are visual learners and need to actually watch someone do each step, so here are some video tutorials that I saw on Youtube which teach you how to make wooden looms.

Alison Russell has a tutorial on making a rake loom with wood and nails.

Alison Russell’s Craft Channel – How to make a long knitting loom. Rake loom.

Note: a rake loom only makes a single-panel item like a scarf or a dishcloth. You wouldn’t be able to knit a hat on this loom as it is. However, you could follow the instructions on one of the other tutorials above and make a second rake and add spacers to be able to make double-knits or hats.

She makes each peg with two nails, so the space in between the nails is the “groove” that you’d find on other looms, rather than having to run your knitting tool on the surface of the nail with no groove – or having to use a tool to scrape a groove into the nails.

Living Wilderness Bushcraft School –

This tutorial shows you how to make a round loom and then how to knit a hat on that round loom.

Workshop Series part 1: Making a hat loom

Workshop Series part 2: Making a woolen hat

The instructor, Johnny Walshe, uses plywood and cotter split pins. Make sure to read the description of the video as he offers a link to a template to help you make the loom. He doesn’t give the exact spacing for the pegs in the video, so you’d have to decide that for yourself or use his template.

Johnny shows you an example of knitting looms made with nails and looms made with the cotter pins (which have an open groove in the middle). I love that he offers various ways to make the loom, depending on what tools you have available. He does it with hand tools and with electric tools.

The style of loom he makes is very similar to looms offered by Cottage Looms.

Easy looms for kids / Simple looms with household items:

If you’re not good with woodworking, but you want a kid-friendly craft project, or if you just want to try making an impromptu loom with household items, this section is for you!

In my search, I did see a couple of kid-friendly tutorials on making a knitting loom with things like Popsicle sticks and a toilet paper roll (or similar cardboard tube). These are what I would call french knitter or spool knitter looms. They are designed for small projects or for knitting an i-cord, which you can then work into other projects.

Hands Occupied – How-to: DIY a Knitting Loom & Knit with it

This is a kid-friendly and simple tutorial on making a loom with Popcicle sticks and a tube (could be a toilet paper roll or another similar tube). The tutorial is long, but she does show you how to actually knit on the toilet paper loom. She also gives examples of things you can make on this style of loom.

Knit Chat – Make Your Own Knitting Loom

The Knit Chat tutorial shows you how to make two looms: 1. a small loom with a toilet paper roll and Popsicle sticks and 2. a loom made out of a plastic bottle/plastic container.

I hope that was helpful. And if you’re like me and you love the idea of a wooden loom, but don’t have the patience, or the skill, to make one, you can find wooden looms like this from Knitting Board, Cottage Looms, and CinDWood looms. Keep in mind that wooden looms tend to be more expensive, so a single loom from these companies will run you between $11-$80 depending on the size of the loom.

You can find Knitting Board looms on sale at JoAnn, Amazon, and eBay (or you can get 10% off your first order if you sign up for the Knitting Board newsletter and order off of their website). Cottage Looms are sold on Etsy and CinDWood sells on their website. Once in a blue moon you can find a used one on eBay.

If you’ve made a loom of your own, please show us a picture in the comments or let us know what you made!

Happy Looming!

 

 

 

 

Fun, Easy Loom Project – Scrubbies!

Blue_Scrubbies

I was on bed rest yesterday after hurting my back and wanted an easy knitting project to do with one of my smaller looms, so I decided to knit a few scrubbies for cleaning in the kitchen and bathroom. This was my first time making them. I’d been seeing a lot of people posting pictures of scrubbies in one of my online loom knitting groups and thought it would be a fun project to try.

I found a set of blue Sugar ‘n Cream cotton yarn and Red Heart scrubby yarn on eBay a couple weeks ago and decided to buy it in case I got the urge to make these.

The first scrubby took me about two hours to make and the subsequent ones took me about an hour and a half to an hour and forty-five minutes. So it’s not a super fast project, but it’s definitely much faster than making a hat or scarf.

The hardest part about making a scrubby is dealing with the cotton and scrubby yarns because they have no give. Acrylic yarns have a little bit of stretch to them, so they are easier to yarn over the pegs as you knit.

Materials needed to make a scrubby:

  • 24-peg loom (or 32-peg loom)
  • 1 skein of Red Heart Scrubby yarn
  • 1 to 2 skeins of cotton yarn such as Sugar ‘n Cream or Premier Home brand yarn (you need a cotton yarn since the scrubby will be getting wet; it will better absorb the water and soap)
  • Knitting tool/hook
  • Tapestry needle

To make a scrubby, you are essentially going to knit as if you’re making a baby hat. You’re going to use the same techniques you’d use for folding over and closing a brim and doing a draw-string closure for the top of a hat. So it is a very good project for a newbie (for a video tutorial, see the links at the bottom of the post).

I made these with an e-wrap knit and I recommend wrapping a little loosely so that your yarn doesn’t get too tight as you’re working. If you are used to using a flat stitch to knit, I would recommend not doing that for this project because the yarn will be nearly impossible to work with. Even with the e-wrap, there were a few times when my wrist was getting sore from trying to yarn over when the cotton yarn got too tight.

Yarns I used to loom knit these scrubbies: Sugar ‘n Cream in Dazzle Blue, Sugar ‘n Cream in Light Blue and Red Heart Scrubby in Waves.

Here is a close-up of the scrubby as I was making it.

scrubby_loom

I made my scrubbies an oblong shape rather than round because it was easier for me rather than pulling super tight on the yarn to get it into a disc shape. I also think that the oblong shape is nice because it basically fits perfectly in my hand.

For detailed, step-by-step instructions, here are some tutorials and videos on the process of making a scrubby on a loom.

Gina Lay has a very easy video on loom knitting scrubbies. She also has another video using an alternate way of casting on with the drawstring method.

If you don’t have scrubby yarn, you can also use tulle. Here is a tutorial from Joys of Creating on making a scrubby with tulle and cotton yarn, instead of scrubby yarn.

And, if you’d prefer a written pattern, I saw this one by Brenda Myers on Ravelry.

Happy Looming!

I hope you enjoy making these as much as I did. If you decide to make them, please let me know how they turned out.

 

Looming Adventure: Rib & Garter Stitch Hat

rib-garter-hat1

So last weekend, I decided to try a pattern of my own. Though it didn’t quite come out the way I envisioned, the overall concept did work out. The picture above is of a baby-sized hat.

I wanted to make a hat that combined a rib stitch and a garter stitch. I will probably make this again and write up more detailed instructions. Essentially, I used a 2×2 rib stitch and in the middle I used garter stitches. But somehow I got a little off, so I think it was more like k1, p1, k2, p1. Then I repeated the rib stitch pattern until I was ready to do a decrease.

When I was ready to start the decrease, I used a garter stitch and then I did the k2tog where you’re taking the loop off a peg and moving it to the left to knit 2 together so that you end up with a loop on every other peg. I kept decreasing until I could close the hat and then I stitched it up with my tapestry needle to make sure the top was secure and flipped the hat inside out (since the rib stitch and garter stitch are pretty much reversible).

I made the hat on the Knitting Board Loom Knitting Basics Loom, which is the small 7 inch loom with 32 pegs. You could similarly use the 10 inch KB loom, the KB All-in-One loom or one of the small KB hat looms. If you’re using a wide-gauge round loom, you could use two #4 worsted weight strands and make the baby/child-sized hat on a 24-peg loom or a 32-peg loom. You could also use a larger loom to make an adult-sized hat.

If you like this pattern, please let me know and I’ll re-make this and write up more detailed instructions for it. But it was nice to try out a different pattern and also to practice a new technique (this is my first hat using a k2tog decrease).

I used Red Heart Ombre Yarn in purple.

 

Fun with double knits

Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

Last weekend, I decided to try my first double-knit project. It is a double stockinette stitch (where both sides of the panel are knit (rather than having a knit on the front side and a purl on the back). The double stockinette looks like a zig-zag pattern on the loom where you zig-zag across in one direction and then zig-zag back in the other direction.

I used the anchor yarn cast on. I’ll have to neaten up the edge at the end.

Here is a link to the instructions for knitting the double stockinette on the Knitting Board website. I followed the stitch pattern from the book that came with my KB Loom Knitting Basics Kit. You can purchase this kit at Joann, Amazon, or the Knitting Board website. Or, if you’re an intermediate knitter and don’t need the book or accessories, you can purchase the 32-peg loom by itself from KB.

I’m nearly done with my scarf and so far, I really love double-knitting. The project comes out so clean and pretty and the stitches have a smooth, finished edge and seem to be very uniform.

Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

The scarf is made with one strand of Red Heart Super Saver Ombre (in Purple). I’d originally single-knitted a few rows with 2 strands of ombre yarn, but since the two skeins were starting with different shades of purple, I didn’t like the mixed color effect. Sometimes I love that, but for the scarf I was making, I really didn’t want it to have that speckled look that you get when you use two different colored strands as one.

I found the double-knit stockinette stitch to be very easy to do and I plan to make more projects with it. I also love my new KB 32-peg loom. It’s easy to hold in your hand and it’s small, so it’s a loom you can take with you anywhere. You can also make hats on it, but I haven’t tried that yet.

The scarf will probably be roughly 5 ft long when finished. I only have about a foot left to go!

Do you like double-knitting or single-knitting? Or does it depend on the project?

 

Loom Review – Loops & Threads 62-Peg Long Loom

Loops & Threads Long Loom (Green)
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

This President’s Day holiday weekend, I started a new project on my large long loom, the Loops & Threads 62-peg long loom (this is the green one). I bought this knitting loom from Michaels as part of a set of four long looms. If you don’t have a Michaels near you, you can find similar long looms from Darice on Amazon.

I’ve been coveting an S loom (either the Authentic Knitting Board Afghan loom or the Darice infinity loom), but since I don’t have one yet, I thought I’d try out this loom. Most of my projects are done on round looms, and the one long loom project I tried (with the shortest one in the set), made me hesitant to use my other long looms.

But despite my initial hesitation, and the couple of bad reviews I saw about this loom, I decided to give it a go and I was pleasantly surprised.

The issue I had with the shorter, blue long loom from this set was that it was more awkward to use than my round looms, and I felt some hand strain after using it for a while. I didn’t have that problem with this green loom because it is so long that I have to use it on a desk or a table, which minimizes me holding the loom for long periods of time. I’m only picking it up when I have to turn the loom. It is 58 cm (about 22 7/8 inches) in length.

There is a 1/2 inch space between pegs (3/4 inch if you count from the center groove of one peg to the center grove of another). It also has anchor pegs on either end of the loom. There is no “starting peg”, so I marked it with a Clover safety-pin stitch marker to help me keep track of my knits and purls.

The project I’m knitting is a cover for the top of my office chair because my cat Nix likes to sit on top of my desk chair when I’m at the computer. Her sharp, little claws dig tiny holes all over the faux leather fabric. Before she totally destroys it, I figured I should make some kind of chair cover.

I probably won’t make a full slip cover, just something long enough to cover the top of the chair all the way around so that when she jumps on it, it will stay in place and provide a cushion between her and the faux leather material.

Here’s a pic of her sitting on the chair behind me (lately, I’ve been keeping a towel on top of the chair to stop her from clawing it until the chair cover is finished).

Venus' cat Nix sitting on the office chair
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

I used a #5 Bulky yarn also from Loops & Threads brand. I got the Barcelona yarn in the Peony color. I love the yarn! The #5 yarn works great on the 62-peg loom because you only need one strand. I am so used to using worsted-weight #4 yarn, that I expected to have to double my strands for this project, but it looks perfect with just one strand of #5.

Here’s a picture of the chair cover so far. If you’re wondering which loom knit stitch I’ve used, it’s the garter stitch (alternating knit and purl rows).

Garter stitch on long loom
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

Pros of the Loops & Threads green long loom:

  • It is fairly light-weight and the spacing of the pegs feels perfect. It’s not too wide, nor is it too close.
  • The pegs feel fully anchored in the holes, so I’m not worried that pegs are going to suddenly fall out or break off.
  • The plastic feels fairly sturdy for the most part.
  • You can make baby blankets, lap-sized throw blankets, or you can make panels for a large blanket. You could also use this for knitting adult-sized clothes.

Cons of the Loops & Threads green long loom:

  • It is a little too flexible. I saw reviews that complained that this loom bends or bows when making a blanket. While I had no problem with this loom using a #5 yarn, I could see the bending/bowing issue being a problem if you’re using a very thick, bulky yarn or you’re doing a lot of double-knit projects. If you press on the loom, you can see it bend in the middle (see my photo below) or if you stick your hand inside and wiggle it, you can see it bow outward. You can also bend it up and down if you press at the sides. This could be a problem if the loom is getting heavy use or you’re trying to double-knit thick yarns.
  • It’s long, but still not long enough if you want to make full- or queen-sized blankets without sewing panels together. You’ll need an S-loom (an infinity loom or an afghan loom). Darice, Loops & Threads, and Knitting Board make larger afghan looms (see the links at the top of this post). Knitting Board also has a 28″ long loom if you want something in-between this loom and the infinity/afghan looms.

See how the loom bends in the middle when I press on it:

Loops & Threads Long Loom Bending
Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

This loom will get you by, but I probably wouldn’t recommend it for doing a lot of double-knitting. If you’re mostly single-knitting in a flat panel, this looms seems fine and I don’t think the bending would be a problem. However, doing a lot of double-knits will cause the loom to bend in the center, which will throw off the spacing between stitches over time. If you’re mostly knitting with thinner yarns, then you might be fine to try a double-knit on this loom.

Overall, I’d give it 3.5 out of 5 stars based on my current experience (4 out of 5 if you’re only going to use it for single knits). You can make scarves, blankets, and other projects. I think this loom would work well for knitting adult-sized clothes, though you might have to knit flat and sew the sides together.

The Loops & Threads Long Loom Set is affordable, especially if you have a 40-60% off coupon from Michaels. So it definitely a good option if you can’t afford an S loom and you want to do blankets, scarves, and hats (though for hats you’d use the smaller looms in the set). If you are interested in seeing reviews about the other looms that come in the Loops & Thread set, please let me know in the comments.

Do you knit with long looms? If so, which ones are your favorites?

 

 

Tips for Making a Spiral Hat

I made a hat for a friend of mine a while ago as a belated Christmas gift. It was one of my favorite things I’ve made so far: a spiral knit hat. Though it is a project beginners can do, I would recommend not doing this hat as your very first loom knit project (unless you’re someone who does traditional needle knits or crochet and you’re used to following a pattern where the stitches change frequently). It’s too confusing for a beginner who has never done anything on a loom before.

If you’re brand new to loom knitting and looking for something easier to do, start with a knit stitch, a basic rib stitch, or a garter stitch hat pattern. But if you’ve done a few projects already, or you’re a more experienced loom knitter, here are some basic tips to help you with making a spiral hat.

Keep in mind that this isn’t a step-by-step pattern tutorial, but it does cover how I made my hat, what size looms to use, and the process I used to keep track of the pattern.

I’d recommend using a 31-peg, 36-peg or 41-peg loom (basically any loom that is divisible by 5 plus 1). In the pictures below, I used the Loops & Threads 36-peg loom. I found a spiral hat pattern on Pinterest. It was designed for the Knifty Knitter 36-peg loom. While there are multiple ways to do the spiral design, I’ve seen this basic pattern used in a few tutorials.

What you will need to do this project:

  • A round knitting loom (preferably a 31, 36, or 41-peg loom)
  • Two skeins of worsted weight yarn (use a solid color)
  • Your knitting tool / knitting hook and a tapestry needle
  • A crochet hook (optional, for working in the ends when your project is done).
  • Removable stitch markers in 2 different colors or washi tape (make sure you have at least 10-15 stitch markers of each color)  – If you don’t have stitch markers that easily open and close, then you will need to use a different method to track your stitches.

Making the Spiral Hat:

The first step in creating the hat is to make a brim. A lot of times, you’re working with some variation of a rib stitch or a garter stitch. I followed what was in the pattern above. However, you can do knit 1, purl 1 or knit 3, purl 2 if you want the lines of the rib to match the spacing of the spiral pattern.

Here’s a picture of the start of the brim of my hat.

Spiral Hat - Starting the Brim
Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

I’m going to assume that most of you know how to make a brim already and skip that part of the instructions. This post deals with how to work the spiral pattern itself.

Basically to do the spiral, you’re working in a pattern of alternating knit and purl stitches.

A few of the patterns I’ve seen for spiral hats use a combination of knit 3, purl 2 or knit 4, purl 1. This sounds similar to the rib stitch, but the key to the spiral is that the stitches move EVERY round/row.

If you’re like me and you are bad at counting stitches, the best way to make this pattern work is to use peg markers that are removable.

My favorite peg markers for this purpose are the Boye Stitch Markers, which have a clasp that you can open and close. You could also use Clover safety-pin style markers or removable washi tape. It doesn’t matter what kind of stitch marker you choose as long as it is easily removable. The Boye ones are very flexible though, so I tend to prefer them if I’m moving my peg markers a lot. The Clover ones are rigid.

My method of creating the spiral:

If you want to try my method for the spiral pattern, you will need around 10-15 stitch markers in TWO colors if you are making an adult-sized hat (20-30 stitch markers all together).

Essentially, what you will do is mark the start of the knit stitches in one color and the start of purl stitches in another color. You have three knit, and two purl. Repeat.

Stitch Markers for Spiral Hat
Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

In the left side of the picture above, you’ll see that I have put a yellow marker on peg 1 where the knit stitches begin. Peg 4 is the start of the purl stitches and it has a blue stitch marker (see the middle of the photo). Skip one peg to account for the second purl stitch. Then, I’ve put another yellow marker on peg 6, which is where the second set of 3 knit stitches begins. I count three down and put another blue marker on peg 9.

Hopefully this isn’t too confusing. Basically, you just mark every peg where you are switching over from knit to purl or purl to knit.

Continue this k3, p2 pattern as you work your way around. When you get to the end of the row, you will have an extra peg between your last purl and the peg where you started. This is where you are going to start your second row. Now your pattern has moved one peg to the left of where you started (peg 1).

Now move your each of the stitch markers one peg to the left. After you’ve moved all the stitch markers to their new position, you’ll then start doing your knit 3 and purl 2 around the loom.

Every time you start a new row, your starting peg will move to the left.

Note: There are other methods that you can use to make a spiral hat without using a marker at the start of your knit and purl pegs.

And, if you don’t have enough stitch markers or moving that many stitch markers every row is too time consuming, you can just mark where your purls start, if that is easier.

The main reason I use stitch markers is that I know myself and I get easily distracted. If the phone rings or if I’m watching a movie and I get caught up in what is happening, I might not realize I’ve skipped a stitch on the pattern. Having colored markers makes it so that I always know where I am on the pattern—as long as I move the stitch markers after I complete each row.

Once you get the hang of the pattern, you’ll keep going one row/round at a time until you get the hat long enough. To gauge the length, I basically tried the hat on (still attached to the loom) to see if it was long enough. I’m not good at counting an exact number of rows. I either have to eyeball the project or I need measure by inches/cm.  Since I was making a hat for an adult woman, I used my own head to test the hat until it was long enough.

[Here is a guide I found on Goodnight Kisses which gives a length and circumference for loom knitted hats]

I used the basic method for closing a hat – sewing each loop on the pegs with a plastic tapestry/darning needle and then taking it off the loom and pulling it like a drawstring and sewing it closed. You can find tutorials for this Youtube. TIP: I do use a jumbo Clover needle for a lot of my projects as it has a large eye which can accommodate bulky yarns or multiple threads of worsted-weight yarn. You can find these at JoAnn, Amazon, and Michaels.

I made my spiral hat without a pom pom, but you can definitely add one at the top.

Color Choices:

The friend I designed the hat for loves yellow, so I made this with two Red Heart Super Saver yarns in two different shades of yellow (bright yellow and pale yellow). The hat reminds me of popcorn.

For the spiral to show really well, you want to use solid color yarns rather than a multi-color/variegated yarn. You could use two similar colors as I did. But you don’t want to use a rainbow yarn as it might not pick up the spiral as well.

Hopefully this made sense! It’s a little hard to explain without a video, but I hope this was helpful.

What is your favorite method for marking stitch changes in a loom pattern?

Blue hat for my niece (hurdle stitch)

Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

My niece’s birthday is this weekend. Happy Birthday, Alayna! So in honor of her birthday, I decided to loom knit a hat in one of her favorite colors (blue). I wanted to make something new that I’d never tried before. In the past, I’ve made garter-stitch, rib-stitch, and spiral-knit hats.

As I was browsing for something new to try, I saw a hat pattern posted on Knitting with Looms and thought it would make a cute hat. I had a skein of blue Red Heart with Love yarn and some multi-colored Red Heart Super Saver yarn so I decided to combine them. I used my Loops & Threads 36-peg round loom.

I used a basic rib stitch for the brim (knit 2, purl 2). The body of the hat uses an alternating knit and purl stitch pattern (see the link above for the exact pattern). It’s called the Hurdle Stitch. To track my stitches, I used my Boye stitch markers. If you’re new to loom knitting, stitch markers are your friends! It’s very helpful to mark your pegs in some way so that you can track where you are in the pattern and where you left off.

Close up of stitches. Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting.

You can use actual stitch markers such as the Boye stitch markers or Clover stitch markers or you can use a rubber band or washi tape. I tried using a sharpie on my first loom, but after a while, the sharpie color wears off. Some people just tie a piece of yarn on the loom (in a different color than the project).

Tip: If I am marking pegs for a pattern that changes during the project, I like the Boye ones because they snap open and closed and you can remove the stitch marker and place it on a new peg at any point in the project. This is helpful for a pattern where you have to change the stitches in the middle.

For this hurdle stitch hat, you could use rubber bands, tape, or closed stitch markers because you’re basically just marking every other peg. You don’t need to remove the markers until the project is over.

The hurdle stitch pattern is suitable for beginners, though if you’ve never knitted before, I would probably start with a basic knit or garter stitch pattern until you get the hang of the knit and purl stitches.

I like the way it came out. Hopefully my niece will like it too!

If you like to loom, what is your favorite stitch pattern?

My first loom

1st-loom-knitting-project
First knitting Project using the Boye Medium Loom

I’ve been loom knitting for about 3 months. I bought my first loom, the Boye medium round loom, during a trip to JoAnn Fabrics with my mother-in-law. It was a spontaneous purchase.

I started a hat that just wasn’t quite working. I’d chosen something more complicated with an open weave and didn’t like the way it looked, so after a few rows, I decided to look on Youtube for a scarf pattern as I figured that the round loom should be able to make scarves as well as hats. So I searched for a loom knitting scarf on a round loom.

I found a video from Loomahat for a garter stitch scarf and immediately set to work. During this time, I got very sick with Bronchitis, so I was bedridden for a week. This was good in the sense that it gave me some time to knit, but I was so sick the first 2-3 days I couldn’t do anything other than eat, sleep, and cough.

The pattern I chose was great because it taught me the basic e-wrap stitch and how to purl. I loved that the loom made it much easier to count stitches. I’ve done some crochet, but I have trouble with many patterns because I’m terrible at counting stitches. All my scarves are done long-ways rather than say crocheting 20 stitches and working my way up the scarf.

Though it took me a few days to complete, I really enjoyed making the scarf. I felt so proud of myself. After that, a loom knitter was born!

If you’d like, you can click to see which looms I own or view my list of completed projects so far.

Thanks so much for stopping by!