Loom Knitting Resources: Hat Size, Loom Gauge & Converting Patterns

I often see certain questions pop up in my loom knitting groups online, so I thought I would post a few resources for beginners (and for those experienced knitters who might like to have a few popular resources linked all in one place).

1. What size loom do I need to make a hat? How long does a hat need to be?

Whether you are making a hat for a baby, child, teen, or adult, there is a loom for that! And a hat length.

Wide Gauge Loom Hat Sizes:

To take the guesswork out of figuring out hat sizing and looms, Denise from Loomahat.com has created a handy dandy Loom Size / Hat Size Chart.

This page is wonderful because it not only includes the hat size chart, but it then goes further for each type of hat to show you what the appropriate loom looks like and what color it is! If you’ve bought a loom from one of the four main brands – Knifty Knitter, Boye, Darice, or Loops & Threads – this is extremely helpful.

Venus’ Tip: Keep in mind that if you are using say a 36-peg loom which could be used for a child’s hat, teen hat or a lean adult hat, which stitch you use can make a difference. If I’m making a child’s hat, I’m going to use a tighter stitch like the u-knit, but if I’m making a hat for an older teen or lean adult, I will use the e-wrap knit stitch.

Note: The Loomahat chart is for wide-gauge looms. If you are making a hat with a small gauge loom, you need a different way of gauging sizes.

Small Gauge Loom Hat Sizes:

According to Authentic Knitting Board, which sells small gauge looms, a child size hat is 64 pegs, a teen hat is 72 pegs and an adult hat is 80 pegs. You’re roughly doubling the amount of pegs you’d use with a wide gauge loom.

2. What gauge is my loom? What brands make 1/2″, 3/8″, or 5/8″ gauge looms?

When you’re starting out, loom gauge can be confusing. What size loom gauge do I own? My pattern calls for a 3/8″ gauge, who makes that? What is the difference between a 1/2″ and a 5/8″ gauge?

Loom gauge is determined by measuring the groove of one peg to the next peg with a ruler or measuring tape. The smaller the gauge, the finer the yarn you need.

Generally speaking, you’d use a thick yarn or two strands of #4 for a 5/8″ gauge loom, one strand of #4 for a 1/2″ gauge loom, and #3 yarn for a 3/8″ loom.

But to help you work out which brands make which sizes, here is a great reference page from Goodknit Kisses.

Some of the brands originally included in the database are no longer manufactured. But it will give you the gauge for several brands still sold today: Boye, CinDWood, Knifty Knitter (sold on eBay), Loops & Threads, and the Martha Stewart Loom. For those who have the Darice loom, it is similar to the Boye, Knifty Knitter and Loops & Threads looms.

It is worth skimming the whole page as there are updated charts at the bottom and information about knitting needle to loom comparison and additional tips.

3. How do I convert a needle knit pattern to loom knitting?

This is one that still confuses me a bit, but there are guides for this as well!

Goodnight Kisses has a needle to loom conversion guide HERE.

The Vintage Storehouse also has a conversion guide, which includes a video.

4. What the does this abbreviation mean? Help, I don’t understand!

If you have come across a pattern that uses a code word that you don’t understand, here is a list of loom knitting abbreviations and what they mean. Unfortunately, there is no link on the page to explain how to do each thing, but it is at least a start to figuring out what the heck certain pattern abbreviations mean.

Isela Phelps also has an abbreviations list that does give a short description of each loom knitting term. Isela is the author of the Loom Knitting Primer and several other loom knitting books and patterns.

5. What is the difference between true knit, u-knit, flat knit, and e-wrap?

Knitting is knitting, right? Well, sort of. There are actually four ways to create a knit stitch. Some patterns specify which knit stitch to use and some let you decide for yourself.

If you’ve wondered what the difference is between the four knit stitches and want a visual comparison and instructions on how to do them, please check out the link above, from Loomahat.com.

Sometimes patterns do not specify which version of the knit stitch to use. Most of the time, I tend to err on the side of caution and assume that the pattern needs a true-knit or u-knit unless it says otherwise (sometimes I get lazy and do e-wrap).

True knit is essentially the opposite of a purl stitch. U-knit is similar to e-wrap, but you are only wrapping around the front of the peg. Flat-knit makes the tightest stitch.

The difference between true knit, u-knit, and flat knit is basically tension on the loom – how tight do you want your stitch to be? E-wrap is very easy, but it creates a twisted stitch, which can effect the look of the pattern.

6. Where can I find free patterns to try?

YouTube is your friend. You can find all kinds of loom knitting tutorials on YouTube. Hats, Scarves, Plush Toys, etc.

Authentic Knitting Board also has a lot of free patterns on their website as well. Keep in mind that these patterns are for small gauge looms, so they won’t work on a Knifty Knitter, Darice, Loops & Threads or Boye Loom. You would need a Knitting Board, CinDWood, Cottage Loom or similar.

Loomahat has a list of free hat patterns on the website. Generally, the patterns are for wide-gauge looms.

Ravelry is another great resource. Some patterns offered there are free and some are for sale.

 

I hope these were helpful. Happy Looming!

If you have a favorite loom knitting chart or resource, let us know in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

Black Spiral Hat for me

I took a break from my moss slip stitch scarf and decided to make a hat for myself, since we’re about to hit our rainy season in Southern California (the bulk of our rainfall hits February through April). I wanted something quick, but fun, so I opted to make a spiral hat for myself.

Since I’m a bit more experienced at making these than when I made my second knit hat a year ago, I decided to try making it a slightly different way. I marked my initial purl stitches with stitch markers, but then I wrapped my knit stitches (without knitting them off) and just did my purl stitches and continued that way around the loom, so that I had a bunch of wrapped pegs where the knit stitches were, and did the purls as I went.

At the end of each row, I went back and knitted off all of the knit stitches, except the ones right before my last purls, so I could keep track.

This way, I didn’t have to move around the stitch markers as much. I’d seen something similar in a Loomahat video last year, where the knit stitches were wrapped but not knitted off so that you can keep track of the 3 knit-2 purl or 4 knit-1 purl pattern.

black_spiral_hat3   black_spiral_hat2

Sorry about the image quality. The picture on the right is closer to the true color of the hat, but I had to take it again with the flash for the spirals to show up.

 

To make this hat, here is the basic pattern:

Tools needed:

* 36-peg wide gauge loom. I used my new Darice loom set.
Note: You need an odd-numbered loom to make the spiral, otherwise you will end up with a rib stitch pattern. Basically, a multiple of 5 plus 1. That plus one is VERY important.
If you want to knit a hat for an adult man or a woman with a larger head, use a 41-peg loom. The 36-peg will make a woman’s or teenager’s hat.
* Knitting hook / knitting tool
* Tapestry Needle for doing the bind off
* 2 skeins of yarn or you can take one skein and wind it up into two balls
(I think I used Red Heart with Love Metallic in Black)
* Optional: Crochet hook to sew in the loose ends when the hat is done.

If you want to know what looms, knitting hooks, and tapestry needles I use, you can click on Venus’ Loom Bag.


Knitting Instructions:

Cast on

(We will do 3 sets of garter stitch rows for the brim. This is NOT a thick, fold-over brim. You’ll need more rows to make a fold-over brim – you can try 6-8 sets of garter stitch)
Row 1: Knit
Row 2: Purl
Row 3: Knit
Row 4: Purl
Row 5: Knit
Row 6: Purl

(Now for the body of the hat, which in my case has a knit 3, purl 2 pattern. You could also do a knit 4, purl 1 pattern, if you prefer). I used an e-wrap stitch.

Knit 3, purl 2 (repeat this for every row).
Note: Because you are using an odd-numbered loom, your starting peg will move with each row.

For an adult hat: Follow this pattern until your hat measures about 9″.
For a man with a large head, you might wish to do 10″. For a teenager, knit 7.5″-8″ long.

* If you are new to loom knitting or find yourself getting very confused with keeping track of your stitch pattern, you’ll want to use stitch markers around the entire loom. See my old post about how I made my first spiral hat. The processed I used was a little more time consuming, but less likely to cause errors in the pattern.

For intermediate/advanced knitters: wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2, wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2 and continue until you have completed one row around the loom. Don’t knit off, just leave the pegs wrapped until you complete your row.

Once your row is done, knit off all of the wrapped pegs. Your starting place has now moved down one peg because you are using an odd-numbered loom. As you start a new row, move your stitch marker to reflect your new starting peg.

If you are working left to right, your starting peg is now one peg to the left of the original starting point. If you are working right to left, your starting peg is now one to the right of your original starting point.

Now, move your starting peg stitch marker and go ahead and knit your next row: knit 3, purl 2 (repeat).

You want to keep track of where your starting peg is for each row. I recommend the Boye stich markers that easily open and close or a diaper-pin style stitch marker as you can remove these without taking your yarn off of the peg.

Continue knitting more rows until your hat measures around 9″ long.

Once your hat is long enough, do a gathered bind off.

A gathered bind off will keep your pattern neat. If you tried to do a decrease, it would most likely throw off your stitch pattern.

Sew in your loose ends at the top of the hat. If needed, tighten your cast on row, then sew in the tail of yarn from when you started the project.

I hope you enjoyed this spiral hat. It was fun and quick to make.

Until next time, happy looming!

black_spiral_hat5

 

 

Patience is a virtue (and the Moss Slip Stitch)

 

 

The past few weeks, I’ve been working on a new stitch pattern called the Moss Slip Stitch from the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary (you can read my review of the book here). The Moss Slip Stitch is a beautiful stitch, especially in small gauge. I have to say it’s the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far and my KB round looms make it look really nice because of the tight 3/8″ loom gauge. The pictures don’t do it justice.

The problem is that I started out with a knit stitch for the selvedge and I didn’t realize it would make the whole scarf curl in. I should have done a garter stitch. While there are purls in this pattern, it was not enough to stop the curling. I think I will need to make this thing double length so that I can loop it around twice and make it a nice infinity scarf/cowl scarf.

Here’s a picture of my recent progress. I still have a long way to go to get this done.

This project requires a lot of patience as more than once, I’ve done 1-2 rows incorrectly and then had to figure out which row I should have done and then unravel the mistakes and start that section over again. And whenever I set the project down and start up again, I tend to lose my place.

It is a lesson in patience.

How can it be that the most beautiful stitch I’ve knitted thus far has resulted in a project I’m hesitant about finishing?

And yet, because the stitch is so lovely, how can I not finish it? The knitter’s moral dilemma.

I will persevere!

For those wanting to try the moss slip stitch on a loom, I would suggest getting a copy of the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary. This pattern is a slightly different version of the moss stitch and I haven’t seen it in other tutorials, or I’d post the pattern instructions here.

It’s similar to the Irish moss and the double moss, but there are stitches that you skip over and slip behind the peg.

I did find a needle knit tutorial of this stitch on YouTube, but the finished piece looks a little different because the video shows how to knit the moss slip stitch in two colors rather than one. However, it is essentially the same pattern (if you follow the video, you’d just need to convert for the loom).

Knitting Organizer (Yarn Bag) Review

After seeing my sister-in-law receive a nice yarn bag for Christmas, I decided to go hunting for my own. I wasn’t sure I wanted to invest the $60 for the one she got (and my honey told me to hold off on buying the fancier ones as he might want to get one for me later).

My sister-in-law calls hers “the only yarn bag you’ll ever need”. LOL. I think over the course of my knitting career, I’ll probably own several knitting bags/organizers because I’m a craft hoarder. I have a hard time saying no to yarn sales/loom sales.

I wanted a yarn bag/organizer that would fit more than one project and that could hold a couple of looms inside. Since I had a gift card for Amazon, I decided to buy it there rather than going to my local Joann.

After looking at a few reviews, I opted for the Knitting Organizer by Besti on Amazon, which at the time of this writing, is $16.95.

It fits about six normal skeins of yarn (or three large skeins) in the front, which is where you’d store yarn for any current knitting projects. The front size has holes at the top allow you to feed yarn through so you don’t have to take the yarn out of the bag. There are three compartments, which are clear so you can see which yarns you’re using.

The back side is one large zippered compartment, so you can use this for yarn, looms, or whatever your heart desires!

See it here:

 

I use the front side for my active yarn and I use the back compartment for my looms and any loom books I’m using for a pattern. I like that I can put 2-4 looms in here and a couple of small knitting books.

The bag will fit round looms easily, but if you are using long looms (the rectangular ones), you might not be able to fit your long loom inside the bag. My small ones would fit, but not my big 62-peg Loops & Threads loom. I have not checked to see if my KB All-in-One loom will fit inside.

The Knitting Organizer by Besti has smaller compartments on the top, and the sides, so you can fit all of your loom hooks, tapestry needles, crochet hooks, knitting needles, etc. So far, the bag seems well-made for what it is. I expected it to look and feel cheap, but it was better than I expected. It’s not going to last 30 years, but what does these days?

It also comes with a long shoulder strap. I think it’s a good bag for schlepping around the house or to take with you to a knitting group. It’s a bit large for air travel unless you are planning to use this as your carry-on item. The dimensions are 12”x15”x10”.

Knitting-Organizer-Besti3

One downside for some users is that the bag does not stand up on it’s own. There’s no cardboard or anything to hold this bag up. It sits upright if you have it filled, but if you only have one skein of yarn and a loom, it’s going to droop and fold in on itself. This was not a problem for me, but it might be a drawback for others.

I love having the zippered compartment on the top for my loom hooks.  And having the yarn holes and velcro at the top is very handy for keeping yarn contained and making it less tempting for my cat to play with. The bag is not totally cat proof, but it’s better than the plastic bags and grocery totes I was using.

I think it’s a great investment for $17 to keep your yarn clean and away from pets or just to reduce clutter and mess while you’re working on one or two projects.

For my purposes, I’d give this a 5 out of 5 for a large, cheap, easy-to-use yarn bag with lots of compartments. If you’re concerned about long-term durability and the yarn bag needing to stand up on it’s own then this is probably going to be a 3.5 out of 5.

At the time of this writing, I’ve been using the bag for almost a week. If I notice any significant issues with the bag over time, I’ll come back and update this post and the review score.

Do you use a knitting organizer or storage bag for your knitting projects? How do you like it? Let us know in the comments.

Happy Looming!

 

*Disclaimer: I purchased this yarn bag and did not receive any compensation for this review. All opinions are my own. This post does include affiliate/advertising links.

Roman Stitch Hats

Roman-stitch-hat-closeup1

One of the projects I worked on over the holidays was a Roman stitch hat for a little girl who is like a goddaughter to us. I knitted a Roman stitch hat for her and a garter stitch hat for her sister.

I got the idea while perusing the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary by Kathy Norris. You can find my review of it here.

I ended up making two of these because I realized the first hat I made was more of a baby/toddler hat, so I made it again on a 36-peg loom so that it would fit an older child.

You can see both hats here:

Roman-stitch-hat-sm-med1

Since I’ve only seen the Roman stitch mentioned in a couple of places, I’m not sure if this is a common stitch, so I won’t post the exact instructions here. If you’d like to make one of these, I’d recommend getting the stitch dictionary.

If you know how to u-knit, purl, and do the gathered bind off, you can make this hat.

I used the Darice 36-peg loom and made a garter stitch brim. This is a wide gauge loom. You could make this on a small gauge loom, but you’d need two strands of thin yarn or one strand of worsted weight.

For the brim, I did three sets of garter stitch, but I did it as purl one row, knit one row instead of starting with the knit row first. The knit stitches are u-knit, not ewrap. I wanted the hat to fit an older child (6-11), not a teen, so I used u-knit so that the stitches would be a little tighter.

I used two skeins of yarn and knit as one. The yarn was Red Heart Super Saver in Country Blue and I think the multi-colored one was the Monet Print colorway, but I’m not sure. It was blue with pink, purple, and yellow mixed in.

Note: The Roman Stitch works best with an EVEN number of pegs, so if you are not using a 36-peg loom, make sure you choose one with an even number.

The hat “pattern” for the child’s hat went like this:

Brim:

E-wrap cast on
Row 1: Purl across
Row 2: Knit across
Row 3: Purl across
Row 4: Knit across
Row 5: Purl across
Row 6: Knit across

Body of the hat:

Roman stitch x 6
(The Roman stitch is essentially made up of knit rows and then a combination of knits and purls. Again, for the exact instructions, see the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary).

Last row: Knit across then do the gathered bind off. For those new to looming, you will need a tapestry needle for the gathered bind off.

Here is a close-up of the Roman stitch:

Roman-stitch-close-up1

You can see in the photo that one of the Roman stitches in the middle has an extra “knit” as I’d lost track of my count so that one section in the middle is a little longer that the rest.

And for those who are curious as to what the inside looks like, here is the reverse side (inside) of the hat:

Roman-stitch-hat-reverse1

This was a fun and relatively easy hat to make! If you’re looking for something new to try, I recommend it.

I also used this yarn combination when I made the hurdle stitch hat for my niece last year.

If you are interested in checking out the Loom Knit Stitch Dictionary, written by Kathy Norris, you can find it at Joann, Amazon, and the Leisure Arts website. The author has written several books on loom knitting.

Do you have a favorite hat stitch or pattern you like to use? Let us know in the comments.

 

Loom Review – KB Baby-Knit Looms

My Baby-Knit Looms from Authentic Knitting Board came in this past week! I was very excited to try them out.

Sometimes it is hard to gauge whether you need to use a 24-peg loom or a 31-peg loom when making baby hats (or how many pegs to use on a small-gauge loom like the All-in-One), so this loom takes the guesswork out of the process of making baby hats and baby booties.

My first impressions:

As you can see from the photos, the set comes with a 56-peg loom in a sea-green/blue-green color and a small 24-peg loom in purple. The sea-green loom is designed for infant hats and the purple loom is for baby booties. Both looms are 3/8″ gauge, so you can use one strand of thin yarn. The booklet suggests one strand of #3.

You’ll also find a knitting hook and a booklet that offers basic instructions, which includes one hat pattern and one baby booties pattern. The booklet covers basic stitches: e-wrap, true knit, purl, and u-knit and shows you methods for casting on and binding off. The instructions are written in English and in French (sorry, no Spanish).

   

According to the booklet, a hat made in true-knit or u-knit will fit infants 0-6 months and e-wrap will fit 6-12 months (up to a 17.5″ circumference).

The first thing I noticed when handling these looms is that they are sturdy. The plastic is dense and the quality is good. I tried pulling on some pegs and they are very securely attached, but they have enough give to bend a little. They don’t feel cheap like my Boye looms. They feel heavier, too. Surprisingly, the material feels very soft in the hand.

I think it might take me a minute to get used to the weight, but I’m very impressed with the quality. I have never been disappointed in the quality of any KB loom I’ve purchased.

One plus of this yarn is that you can use a fine baby yarn for a more delicate look (like you’d get with needle-knit or crochet). Of course you can double or triple a thin yarn, but this loom allows you to use one strand, which is nice if you don’t want your hat to feel too thick, such as for a newborn hat in the summertime.

 

Thoughts after knitting with it for an hour:

The gauge is pretty narrow. I think it might be a little smaller than my KB Basics 32-peg loom, but I’d have to measure to be sure as KB doesn’t list the gauge for on the 32-peg loom on their website.

When I got the Baby-Knit Looms, I didn’t have a #3 yarn handy except for a wool yarn I didn’t want to use, so I knitted with a Caron soft #4 and that worked.

So far, I like the loom and as mentioned, I think one of the big selling-points of this loom is it takes the confusion out of making baby sets.

For beginning knitters, if you don’t have an exact pattern you’re working from that calls for a specific size of loom, it can be a little confusing to know whether you should use a 24-peg or a 31-peg loom. I like that this loom can make hats for babies up to 12 months and all you need to do is change the stitch to make the hat smaller or larger. For babies older than 12 months, you’d need to use a wide gauge 31-peg loom or you can make it on the All-in-One loom. Here is a link to some of the baby patterns on the KB website. Right now, KB has 3 patterns for the Baby-Knit Loom.

I would give this loom 4.5 stars.

It’s sturdy and well-made, it takes the guesswork out of sizing, and it is very affordable. I’d like to see more patterns for it, but the product is new and I’m sure designers will start coming up with more adorable baby sets to suit this loom.

 

*Disclosure: I purchased this loom set and did not receive any compensation for this review. All opinions are my own. This post does include affiliate/advertising links.

 

 

 

Sorry I haven’t posted / Loom Knit Doll Patterns

Sorry I haven’t posted for a while. I had my surgery in July, which went well, but during the procedure, they discovered another condition, which means I’ll be needing another surgery. If all goes well, I’ll have my second surgery this year. So I’ve been a bit distracted and haven’t been posting.

Since I my last post, I did finish my friend’s green triple knit scarf and I started another scarf in the loops & threads Barcelona yarn, but I’m not sure what the pattern’s name is called. I also made some pretty purple scrubbies for a friend’s birthday using lavender purple cotton yarn and sparkly white/clear scrubby yarn.

I don’t have any pictures to post right now, but I don’t want to leave without sharing something with you all, so I’m going to share some loom knit doll patterns!

There’s a woman in my online knitting group who makes very cool loom knit dolls in all kinds of shapes: puppies, unicorns, monkeys, zebras, sheep, birds, and more!

Here’s an example of Christie Foo’s panda pattern:

Christie Foo's Panda Pattern
(c) Christie Foo

She has many designs on Ravelry, so please check out some of her awesome work.

Here’s another one of her patterns for adorable elephants!

Christie Foo's Loom Knit Baby Elephant Pattern
(c) Christie Foo

I really love her work and I hope you’ll enjoy these patterns, too.

Christie lists all the looms and types of yarn you’ll need for each pattern. As you can see in the two pictures above, she’ll also include the looms she used in the picture on each pattern so you know what type of loom she’s referring to.

I hope you are all well and that you had a great summer.

I’d love to hear what you’ve been working on. Feel free to post about your projects in the comments.

Happy looming!

 

Will post more reviews and patterns soon

Sorry it’s been a little while since I’ve posted. I’ve been dealing with a health issue and there was a flurry of activity recently as my 40th birthday just passed. On the plus side, two of my friends got me a book on loom knitting afghans and I bought the Knitting Board Double-Knit Rotating Loom with an Amazon gift card I got on my birthday.

I did work on a few projects in April and May. In April, I was mostly trying to figure out how to do the Criss-Cross stitch, which is a double-knit pattern for the loom. I made a short, round scarf and I’ve started working on a bigger multi-colored scarf in this pattern. I hope to post a pattern review and links, but this one is complicated, so it might take me a while to put it up.

I also made a basket weave hat in May after seeing a stitch pattern in Isela Phelp’s Loom Knitting Primer book. It was the first time that I’ve had to be really careful with my stitches and actually write down each row as I worked the pattern. It’s easy to miss a step and screw up the pattern. I made a pretty green hat for my niece, Taylor, whose birthday is the same week as mine. Go Geminis! 🙂

Here’s a close-up of the basket-weave hat. The lighting doesn’t show all of the shifts in the pattern. I used a folded over rib stitch for the brim.

Basket_Weave_Hat

If you’d like to try the basket weave, I definitely recommend Isela’s book, which you can find on Amazon (click the picture for details). If you just want to learn this stitch, she has instructions for the basket weave in a free loom knitting stitch guide on her blog.

Note: Isela also creates patterns for Knitting Board, so if you check out their free patterns on their website, you’ll see a few that she has created.

This month, I’m working on a triple stitch scarf for a close friend (who coincidentally also had a birthday the same week as my niece and I). My friend wanted a scarf in either olive green or forest green so I found a nice red heart yarn that was a cross between the two. I’ll probably post pictures of it later once it’s finished.

I’m hoping to post a review of the All-in-One loom this month, which is the 18-inch loom by Knitting Board.

My posting schedule might be a little sporadic this summer as things are pretty hectic at work and I will be having a surgery in July. I’m hoping I’ll be able to knit as I recuperate!

Do you have any exciting projects you’re knitting this summer? Let us know in the comments below.

Happy Looming!

Make your own knitting looms

I stumbled across an article a month ago explaining how to make your own knitting looms and I thought that was a cool idea! I was looking for a friend of mine who is just getting into loom knitting (and who has a table saw and woodworking equipment at home).

Are you, or your partner, very handy with tools? Do you have a saw or a sander? If so, then this post is for you. (Or, if you want to do a kid-friendly craft project and make a smaller loom/french knitter, scroll to the bottom)

I will admit that cutting wood and sanding is not my forte. That is the domain of my fiancé who is very good at making things like wooden pens, mugs, boxes, bookcases, etc. He’s the one who can look at a piece of wood and know what tree it is from and who can wax on about different types of nuts, bolts, and screws and what you’d use them for.

While I am not confident enough with these things to make my own looms, I love the idea that with a few pieces of wood and certain nails or screws that you can have a knitting loom! So I wanted to share some resources with those of you who are far more adventurous than I am.

Wooden Loom Tutorials (Written Instructions)

Instructables – Make an Adjustable Knitting Loom

This Instructables tutorial shows you how to make a knitting loom similar to the KB All-in-One loom, where you can adjust the side pieces to the size you want. You can use it to make a hat, socks, or scarves and flat-panel items. What I like about this loom: 1. It is adjustable. 2. The pegs have grooves in them. 3. You can make it in different gauges (there are two versions/instructions for the loom, depending on the spacing you need). There is even a tutorial for making a knitting tool/hook!

The only potential drawback I see is that over time, the pegs might get worn down from the loom hook scraping the wood. I suppose you could put some sort of epoxy or finish on the wood to minimize this or just make the pegs replaceable.

This tutorial is probably a little more advanced than some of the other tutorials.

Knitting Naturally – Make Your Own Knitting Loom

Knitting Naturally covers making a basic knitting loom with wood and nails. It uses more basic tools, so if you don’t have a fancy table saw and router table or a drill press, you can still get the job done if you have sandpaper, a hammer, nails, wood, and a saw. While the instructions are not too complicated, the only drawback to this tutorial is that there aren’t pictures of what each step looks like, so you’re just reading the instructions.

Video Tutorials

I know some of you are visual learners and need to actually watch someone do each step, so here are some video tutorials that I saw on Youtube which teach you how to make wooden looms.

Alison Russell has a tutorial on making a rake loom with wood and nails.

Alison Russell’s Craft Channel – How to make a long knitting loom. Rake loom.

Note: a rake loom only makes a single-panel item like a scarf or a dishcloth. You wouldn’t be able to knit a hat on this loom as it is. However, you could follow the instructions on one of the other tutorials above and make a second rake and add spacers to be able to make double-knits or hats.

She makes each peg with two nails, so the space in between the nails is the “groove” that you’d find on other looms, rather than having to run your knitting tool on the surface of the nail with no groove – or having to use a tool to scrape a groove into the nails.

Living Wilderness Bushcraft School –

This tutorial shows you how to make a round loom and then how to knit a hat on that round loom.

Workshop Series part 1: Making a hat loom

Workshop Series part 2: Making a woolen hat

The instructor, Johnny Walshe, uses plywood and cotter split pins. Make sure to read the description of the video as he offers a link to a template to help you make the loom. He doesn’t give the exact spacing for the pegs in the video, so you’d have to decide that for yourself or use his template.

Johnny shows you an example of knitting looms made with nails and looms made with the cotter pins (which have an open groove in the middle). I love that he offers various ways to make the loom, depending on what tools you have available. He does it with hand tools and with electric tools.

The style of loom he makes is very similar to looms offered by Cottage Looms.

Easy looms for kids / Simple looms with household items:

If you’re not good with woodworking, but you want a kid-friendly craft project, or if you just want to try making an impromptu loom with household items, this section is for you!

In my search, I did see a couple of kid-friendly tutorials on making a knitting loom with things like Popsicle sticks and a toilet paper roll (or similar cardboard tube). These are what I would call french knitter or spool knitter looms. They are designed for small projects or for knitting an i-cord, which you can then work into other projects.

Hands Occupied – How-to: DIY a Knitting Loom & Knit with it

This is a kid-friendly and simple tutorial on making a loom with Popcicle sticks and a tube (could be a toilet paper roll or another similar tube). The tutorial is long, but she does show you how to actually knit on the toilet paper loom. She also gives examples of things you can make on this style of loom.

Knit Chat – Make Your Own Knitting Loom

The Knit Chat tutorial shows you how to make two looms: 1. a small loom with a toilet paper roll and Popsicle sticks and 2. a loom made out of a plastic bottle/plastic container.

I hope that was helpful. And if you’re like me and you love the idea of a wooden loom, but don’t have the patience, or the skill, to make one, you can find wooden looms like this from Knitting Board, Cottage Looms, and CinDWood looms. Keep in mind that wooden looms tend to be more expensive, so a single loom from these companies will run you between $11-$80 depending on the size of the loom.

You can find Knitting Board looms on sale at JoAnn, Amazon, and eBay (or you can get 10% off your first order if you sign up for the Knitting Board newsletter and order off of their website). Cottage Looms are sold on Etsy and CinDWood sells on their website. Once in a blue moon you can find a used one on eBay.

If you’ve made a loom of your own, please show us a picture in the comments or let us know what you made!

Happy Looming!

 

 

 

 

Fun, Easy Loom Project – Scrubbies!

Blue_Scrubbies

I was on bed rest yesterday after hurting my back and wanted an easy knitting project to do with one of my smaller looms, so I decided to knit a few scrubbies for cleaning in the kitchen and bathroom. This was my first time making them. I’d been seeing a lot of people posting pictures of scrubbies in one of my online loom knitting groups and thought it would be a fun project to try.

I found a set of blue Sugar ‘n Cream cotton yarn and Red Heart scrubby yarn on eBay a couple weeks ago and decided to buy it in case I got the urge to make these.

The first scrubby took me about two hours to make and the subsequent ones took me about an hour and a half to an hour and forty-five minutes. So it’s not a super fast project, but it’s definitely much faster than making a hat or scarf.

The hardest part about making a scrubby is dealing with the cotton and scrubby yarns because they have no give. Acrylic yarns have a little bit of stretch to them, so they are easier to yarn over the pegs as you knit.

Materials needed to make a scrubby:

  • 24-peg loom (or 32-peg loom)
  • 1 skein of Red Heart Scrubby yarn
  • 1 to 2 skeins of cotton yarn such as Sugar ‘n Cream or Premier Home brand yarn (you need a cotton yarn since the scrubby will be getting wet; it will better absorb the water and soap)
  • Knitting tool/hook
  • Tapestry needle

To make a scrubby, you are essentially going to knit as if you’re making a baby hat. You’re going to use the same techniques you’d use for folding over and closing a brim and doing a draw-string closure for the top of a hat. So it is a very good project for a newbie (for a video tutorial, see the links at the bottom of the post).

I made these with an e-wrap knit and I recommend wrapping a little loosely so that your yarn doesn’t get too tight as you’re working. If you are used to using a flat stitch to knit, I would recommend not doing that for this project because the yarn will be nearly impossible to work with. Even with the e-wrap, there were a few times when my wrist was getting sore from trying to yarn over when the cotton yarn got too tight.

Yarns I used to loom knit these scrubbies: Sugar ‘n Cream in Dazzle Blue, Sugar ‘n Cream in Light Blue and Red Heart Scrubby in Waves.

Here is a close-up of the scrubby as I was making it.

scrubby_loom

I made my scrubbies an oblong shape rather than round because it was easier for me rather than pulling super tight on the yarn to get it into a disc shape. I also think that the oblong shape is nice because it basically fits perfectly in my hand.

For detailed, step-by-step instructions, here are some tutorials and videos on the process of making a scrubby on a loom.

Gina Lay has a very easy video on loom knitting scrubbies. She also has another video using an alternate way of casting on with the drawstring method.

If you don’t have scrubby yarn, you can also use tulle. Here is a tutorial from Joys of Creating on making a scrubby with tulle and cotton yarn, instead of scrubby yarn.

And, if you’d prefer a written pattern, I saw this one by Brenda Myers on Ravelry.

Happy Looming!

I hope you enjoy making these as much as I did. If you decide to make them, please let me know how they turned out.