Black Spiral Hat for me

I took a break from my moss slip stitch scarf and decided to make a hat for myself, since we’re about to hit our rainy season in Southern California (the bulk of our rainfall hits February through April). I wanted something quick, but fun, so I opted to make a spiral hat for myself.

Since I’m a bit more experienced at making these than when I made my second knit hat a year ago, I decided to try making it a slightly different way. I marked my initial purl stitches with stitch markers, but then I wrapped my knit stitches (without knitting them off) and just did my purl stitches and continued that way around the loom, so that I had a bunch of wrapped pegs where the knit stitches were, and did the purls as I went.

At the end of each row, I went back and knitted off all of the knit stitches, except the ones right before my last purls, so I could keep track.

This way, I didn’t have to move around the stitch markers as much. I’d seen something similar in a Loomahat video last year, where the knit stitches were wrapped but not knitted off so that you can keep track of the 3 knit-2 purl or 4 knit-1 purl pattern.

black_spiral_hat3   black_spiral_hat2

Sorry about the image quality. The picture on the right is closer to the true color of the hat, but I had to take it again with the flash for the spirals to show up.

 

To make this hat, here is the basic pattern:

Tools needed:

* 36-peg wide gauge loom. I used my new Darice loom set.
Note: You need an odd-numbered loom to make the spiral, otherwise you will end up with a rib stitch pattern. Basically, a multiple of 5 plus 1. That plus one is VERY important.
If you want to knit a hat for an adult man or a woman with a larger head, use a 41-peg loom. The 36-peg will make a woman’s or teenager’s hat.
* Knitting hook / knitting tool
* Tapestry Needle for doing the bind off
* 2 skeins of yarn or you can take one skein and wind it up into two balls
(I think I used Red Heart with Love Metallic in Black)
* Optional: Crochet hook to sew in the loose ends when the hat is done.

If you want to know what looms, knitting hooks, and tapestry needles I use, you can click on Venus’ Loom Bag.


Knitting Instructions:

Cast on

(We will do 3 sets of garter stitch rows for the brim. This is NOT a thick, fold-over brim. You’ll need more rows to make a fold-over brim – you can try 6-8 sets of garter stitch)
Row 1: Knit
Row 2: Purl
Row 3: Knit
Row 4: Purl
Row 5: Knit
Row 6: Purl

(Now for the body of the hat, which in my case has a knit 3, purl 2 pattern. You could also do a knit 4, purl 1 pattern, if you prefer). I used an e-wrap stitch.

Knit 3, purl 2 (repeat this for every row).
Note: Because you are using an odd-numbered loom, your starting peg will move with each row.

For an adult hat: Follow this pattern until your hat measures about 9″.
For a man with a large head, you might wish to do 10″. For a teenager, knit 7.5″-8″ long.

* If you are new to loom knitting or find yourself getting very confused with keeping track of your stitch pattern, you’ll want to use stitch markers around the entire loom. See my old post about how I made my first spiral hat. The processed I used was a little more time consuming, but less likely to cause errors in the pattern.

For intermediate/advanced knitters: wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2, wrap 3 pegs, then purl 2 and continue until you have completed one row around the loom. Don’t knit off, just leave the pegs wrapped until you complete your row.

Once your row is done, knit off all of the wrapped pegs. Your starting place has now moved down one peg because you are using an odd-numbered loom. As you start a new row, move your stitch marker to reflect your new starting peg.

If you are working left to right, your starting peg is now one peg to the left of the original starting point. If you are working right to left, your starting peg is now one to the right of your original starting point.

Now, move your starting peg stitch marker and go ahead and knit your next row: knit 3, purl 2 (repeat).

You want to keep track of where your starting peg is for each row. I recommend the Boye stich markers that easily open and close or a diaper-pin style stitch marker as you can remove these without taking your yarn off of the peg.

Continue knitting more rows until your hat measures around 9″ long.

Once your hat is long enough, do a gathered bind off.

A gathered bind off will keep your pattern neat. If you tried to do a decrease, it would most likely throw off your stitch pattern.

Sew in your loose ends at the top of the hat. If needed, tighten your cast on row, then sew in the tail of yarn from when you started the project.

I hope you enjoyed this spiral hat. It was fun and quick to make.

Until next time, happy looming!

black_spiral_hat5

 

 

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