Loom Review – Loops & Threads 62-Peg Long Loom

Loops & Threads Long Loom (Green)
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

This President’s Day holiday weekend, I started a new project on my large long loom, the Loops & Threads 62-peg long loom (this is the green one). I bought this knitting loom from Michaels as part of a set of four long looms. If you don’t have a Michaels near you, you can find similar long looms from Darice on Amazon.

I’ve been coveting an S loom (either the Authentic Knitting Board Afghan loom or the Darice infinity loom), but since I don’t have one yet, I thought I’d try out this loom. Most of my projects are done on round looms, and the one long loom project I tried (with the shortest one in the set), made me hesitant to use my other long looms.

But despite my initial hesitation, and the couple of bad reviews I saw about this loom, I decided to give it a go and I was pleasantly surprised.

The issue I had with the shorter, blue long loom from this set was that it was more awkward to use than my round looms, and I felt some hand strain after using it for a while. I didn’t have that problem with this green loom because it is so long that I have to use it on a desk or a table, which minimizes me holding the loom for long periods of time. I’m only picking it up when I have to turn the loom. It is 58 cm (about 22 7/8 inches) in length.

There is a 1/2 inch space between pegs (3/4 inch if you count from the center groove of one peg to the center grove of another). It also has anchor pegs on either end of the loom. There is no “starting peg”, so I marked it with a Clover safety-pin stitch marker to help me keep track of my knits and purls.

The project I’m knitting is a cover for the top of my office chair because my cat Nix likes to sit on top of my desk chair when I’m at the computer. Her sharp, little claws dig tiny holes all over the faux leather fabric. Before she totally destroys it, I figured I should make some kind of chair cover.

I probably won’t make a full slip cover, just something long enough to cover the top of the chair all the way around so that when she jumps on it, it will stay in place and provide a cushion between her and the faux leather material.

Here’s a pic of her sitting on the chair behind me (lately, I’ve been keeping a towel on top of the chair to stop her from clawing it until the chair cover is finished).

Venus' cat Nix sitting on the office chair
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

I used a #5 Bulky yarn also from Loops & Threads brand. I got the Barcelona yarn in the Peony color. I love the yarn! The #5 yarn works great on the 62-peg loom because you only need one strand. I am so used to using worsted-weight #4 yarn, that I expected to have to double my strands for this project, but it looks perfect with just one strand of #5.

Here’s a picture of the chair cover so far. If you’re wondering which loom knit stitch I’ve used, it’s the garter stitch (alternating knit and purl rows).

Garter stitch on long loom
Photo by Venus / Adventures in Loom Knitting

Pros of the Loops & Threads green long loom:

  • It is fairly light-weight and the spacing of the pegs feels perfect. It’s not too wide, nor is it too close.
  • The pegs feel fully anchored in the holes, so I’m not worried that pegs are going to suddenly fall out or break off.
  • The plastic feels fairly sturdy for the most part.
  • You can make baby blankets, lap-sized throw blankets, or you can make panels for a large blanket. You could also use this for knitting adult-sized clothes.

Cons of the Loops & Threads green long loom:

  • It is a little too flexible. I saw reviews that complained that this loom bends or bows when making a blanket. While I had no problem with this loom using a #5 yarn, I could see the bending/bowing issue being a problem if you’re using a very thick, bulky yarn or you’re doing a lot of double-knit projects. If you press on the loom, you can see it bend in the middle (see my photo below) or if you stick your hand inside and wiggle it, you can see it bow outward. You can also bend it up and down if you press at the sides. This could be a problem if the loom is getting heavy use or you’re trying to double-knit thick yarns.
  • It’s long, but still not long enough if you want to make full- or queen-sized blankets without sewing panels together. You’ll need an S-loom (an infinity loom or an afghan loom). Darice, Loops & Threads, and Knitting Board make larger afghan looms (see the links at the top of this post). Knitting Board also has a 28″ long loom if you want something in-between this loom and the infinity/afghan looms.

See how the loom bends in the middle when I press on it:

Loops & Threads Long Loom Bending
Photo by Venus – Adventures in Loom Knitting

This loom will get you by, but I probably wouldn’t recommend it for doing a lot of double-knitting. If you’re mostly single-knitting in a flat panel, this looms seems fine and I don’t think the bending would be a problem. However, doing a lot of double-knits will cause the loom to bend in the center, which will throw off the spacing between stitches over time. If you’re mostly knitting with thinner yarns, then you might be fine to try a double-knit on this loom.

Overall, I’d give it 3.5 out of 5 stars based on my current experience (4 out of 5 if you’re only going to use it for single knits). You can make scarves, blankets, and other projects. I think this loom would work well for knitting adult-sized clothes, though you might have to knit flat and sew the sides together.

The Loops & Threads Long Loom Set is affordable, especially if you have a 40-60% off coupon from Michaels. So it definitely a good option if you can’t afford an S loom and you want to do blankets, scarves, and hats (though for hats you’d use the smaller looms in the set). If you are interested in seeing reviews about the other looms that come in the Loops & Thread set, please let me know in the comments.

Do you knit with long looms? If so, which ones are your favorites?

 

 

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